Discussion:
Black Enslavement in Canada
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AlleyCat
2019-04-14 02:33:25 UTC
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Black Enslavement in Canada

In early Canada, the enslavement of African peoples was a legal instrument
that helped fuel colonial economic enterprise. Enslavement was introduced
by French colonists in New France in the early 1600s, and lasted until it
was abolished throughout British North America in 1834.

During that two-century period, Canada was involved in the transatlantic
slave trade. Within the country's borders, people were bought, sold and
enslaved. Canada was further linked to the institution of enslavement
through international trade. The country exchanged products such as salted
cod and timber for slave-produced goods such as rum, molasses, tobacco and
sugar from slaveholding colonies in the Caribbean.

ration showing deck plans and cross sections of British slave ship Brookes
under the regulated slave trade act of 1788.
Terminology

There is debate about the terms enslavement and enslaved people, on one
hand, and slavery and slaves on the other. Many authors and historians use
both sets of terms, which have similar meanings but can represent
different perspectives on historical events. For example, slave is used to
describe a person's property. It is a noun that critics of the term say
reduces a person to a position they never chose to be in. The term
enslaved describes the state of being held as a slave. Historians who
prefer enslaved person explain that it makes it clearer that enslavement
was imposed on people against their will. They also mention that adding
the word person brings forward the humanity of the people the term
describes.

Some historians continue to use the terms slave and slavery, without
adding person, arguing that the terms are clearer and more familiar. They
argue that adding the word person implies a level of autonomy that
enslavement took away from people.
Enslavement in New France

In the early 17th century, French colonizers in New France began the
practice of chattel slavery, in which people were treated as personal
property that could be bought, sold, traded and inherited. The first
slaves in New France were Indigenous peoples a large percentage of whom
came from the Pawnee Nation located in present-day Nebraska, Oklahoma and
Kansas. Many were captured during war and sold to other Indigenous nations
or to European traders. Some French colonists acquired enslaved Black
people through private sales, and some received Indigenous and African
slaves as gifts from Indigenous allies. Out of approximately 4,200 slaves
in New France at the peak of slavery, about 2,700 were Indigenous people
who were enslaved until 1783, and at least 1,443 were Black people who
were enslaved between the late 1600s and 1831. The rest of the slaves were
from other territories and other countries. Over time, enslaved people
from any Indigenous group in North America were generally referred to as
panis - a term that became synonymous with "enslaved Indigenous person."
Indigenous and African individuals held in bondage were also commonly
referred to as domestiques or servants - words that almost always meant
slave.

https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/black-enslavement
%
2019-04-14 03:25:10 UTC
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Post by AlleyCat
Black Enslavement in Canada
In early Canada, the enslavement of African peoples was a legal instrument
that helped fuel colonial economic enterprise. Enslavement was introduced
by French colonists in New France in the early 1600s, and lasted until it
was abolished throughout British North America in 1834.
During that two-century period, Canada was involved in the transatlantic
slave trade. Within the country's borders, people were bought, sold and
enslaved. Canada was further linked to the institution of enslavement
through international trade. The country exchanged products such as salted
cod and timber for slave-produced goods such as rum, molasses, tobacco and
sugar from slaveholding colonies in the Caribbean.
ration showing deck plans and cross sections of British slave ship Brookes
under the regulated slave trade act of 1788.
Terminology
There is debate about the terms enslavement and enslaved people, on one
hand, and slavery and slaves on the other. Many authors and historians use
both sets of terms, which have similar meanings but can represent
different perspectives on historical events. For example, slave is used to
describe a person's property. It is a noun that critics of the term say
reduces a person to a position they never chose to be in. The term
enslaved describes the state of being held as a slave. Historians who
prefer enslaved person explain that it makes it clearer that enslavement
was imposed on people against their will. They also mention that adding
the word person brings forward the humanity of the people the term
describes.
Some historians continue to use the terms slave and slavery, without
adding person, arguing that the terms are clearer and more familiar. They
argue that adding the word person implies a level of autonomy that
enslavement took away from people.
Enslavement in New France
In the early 17th century, French colonizers in New France began the
practice of chattel slavery, in which people were treated as personal
property that could be bought, sold, traded and inherited. The first
slaves in New France were Indigenous peoples a large percentage of whom
came from the Pawnee Nation located in present-day Nebraska, Oklahoma and
Kansas. Many were captured during war and sold to other Indigenous nations
or to European traders. Some French colonists acquired enslaved Black
people through private sales, and some received Indigenous and African
slaves as gifts from Indigenous allies. Out of approximately 4,200 slaves
in New France at the peak of slavery, about 2,700 were Indigenous people
who were enslaved until 1783, and at least 1,443 were Black people who
were enslaved between the late 1600s and 1831. The rest of the slaves were
from other territories and other countries. Over time, enslaved people
from any Indigenous group in North America were generally referred to as
panis - a term that became synonymous with "enslaved Indigenous person."
Indigenous and African individuals held in bondage were also commonly
referred to as domestiques or servants - words that almost always meant
slave.
https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/black-enslavement
native canadians had slaves
AlleyCat
2019-04-14 23:58:49 UTC
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On Sat, 13 Apr 2019 20:25:10 -0700, % says...
Post by %
native canadians had slaves
And WERE slaves themselves. Yeah... so... and?

Does that excuse Canadian slavery?

WHO held them AS slaves? Other "native indigenous" and Europeans.

"Small wonder then, that many of us today are unaware that Indigenous and
African peoples were forced into bondage across colonial Canada."

https://www.cbc.ca/radio/ideas/canada-s-slavery-secret-the-whitewashing-
of-200-years-of-enslavement-1.4726313
--
Canada's Shameful, Modern-Day Slave Trade
https://torontosun.com/2012/02/10/canadas-shameful-modern-day-slave-
trade/wcm/2e410af6-9dc4-4ef7-bc3e-821a5970ed41

Black Enslavement in Canada
https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/black-enslavement

Colonial Canada Had Slavery For More Than 200 Years. And Yes, It Still
Matters Today
https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2017/06/17/slavery-canada-history_n_
16806804.html

Canada's Slavery Secret: The Whitewashing Of 200 Years Of Enslavement
https://www.cbc.ca/radio/ideas/canada-s-slavery-secret-the-whitewashing-
of-200-years-of-enslavement-1.4726313
Stephen Hall
2019-04-18 19:17:12 UTC
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Post by AlleyCat
Does that excuse Canadian slavery?
Why should there be any excuses?

Slavery existed everywhere, including Africa.

Let's face the truth: niggers should be glad white people gave them freedom
and a chance to be part of society. Unfortunately, many of them monkeys to
this day are failing to be civilized members of their communities, but
that's another story.
--
S. Hall
AlleyCat
2019-04-19 02:21:14 UTC
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On 18 Apr 2019 19:17:12 GMT, Stephen Hall says...
Post by Stephen Hall
Post by AlleyCat
Does that excuse Canadian slavery?
Why should there be any excuses?
Ummm... there SHOULDN'T be, that's why I asked THAT particular question.

No help needed, but I appreciate the effort.
%
2019-04-19 02:30:35 UTC
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Post by AlleyCat
On 18 Apr 2019 19:17:12 GMT, Stephen Hall says...
Post by Stephen Hall
Post by AlleyCat
Does that excuse Canadian slavery?
Why should there be any excuses?
Ummm... there SHOULDN'T be, that's why I asked THAT particular question.
No help needed, but I appreciate the effort.
the british sent their children to canada ,
where they were used as mostly slave labor
Stephen Hall
2019-04-19 10:26:36 UTC
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Post by AlleyCat
On 18 Apr 2019 19:17:12 GMT, Stephen Hall says...
Post by Stephen Hall
Post by AlleyCat
Does that excuse Canadian slavery?
Why should there be any excuses?
Ummm... there SHOULDN'T be, that's why I asked THAT particular question.
No help needed, but I appreciate the effort.
Just throwing in my two cents.
--
S. Hall
BeamMeUpScotty
2019-04-19 19:56:10 UTC
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Post by Stephen Hall
Post by AlleyCat
On 18 Apr 2019 19:17:12 GMT, Stephen Hall says...
Post by Stephen Hall
Post by AlleyCat
Does that excuse Canadian slavery?
Why should there be any excuses?
Ummm... there SHOULDN'T be, that's why I asked THAT particular question.
No help needed, but I appreciate the effort.
Just throwing in my two cents.
You know destroying statues in the Souther United States, is akin to
Haiti where the slaves actually killed and chased away all the former
slave owners..... because they considered everyone evil but the victims.


In the end we see Haiti has been a failing place ever since.


And the part that's scary is that Democrats and Liberals and Leftists
all want to repeat that in the South by destroying statues and
condemning white male heterosexual men.... They've actually been doing
it for decades, is it any wonder that the South is beginning to look a
little like a failed island that has been the symbol of 3rd world
destitution for a century in the Caribbean.

It seems that the mindset that once you get rid of the evil slave owners
the place will be a Utopian paradise is already proven wrong and yet
Democrats Liberals and Marxists try to re-create the same kind of
failure over and over everywhere they go. They're like a disease that
spreads misery.
--
That's Karma
AlleyCat
2019-04-20 00:39:23 UTC
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On Fri, 19 Apr 2019 15:56:10 -0400, BeamMeUpScotty says...
Post by BeamMeUpScotty
is it any wonder that the South is beginning to look a
little like a failed island that has been the symbol of 3rd world
destitution for a century in the Caribbean.
I don't know what TV shows you've been watching (ER comes to mind when
they had to go to Biloxi), but we are NOT a failed island.

I've lived in the south for 56 years, and every time I've traveled North,
I saw that we're doing DAMN well, comparatively speaking.

The ONLY depressed places here, are where Democrats have taken over. When
I got to Jackson, MS in 1989, it was still a pretty decent place to live.

Now? Fuhgetaboutit. I moved out to the 'burbs in about 1995 and never
looked back. It's REALLY nice out in the burbs, especially when they
started building out and away from Jackson.

It was so nice to pull up to a drive-thru and hear, "Welcome to
McDonald's... may I help you?", instead of just MCDONALD'S, with an
attitude like we're bothering them.
BeamMeUpScotty
2019-04-20 03:05:16 UTC
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Post by AlleyCat
On Fri, 19 Apr 2019 15:56:10 -0400, BeamMeUpScotty says...
Post by BeamMeUpScotty
is it any wonder that the South is beginning to look a
little like a failed island that has been the symbol of 3rd world
destitution for a century in the Caribbean.
I don't know what TV shows you've been watching (ER comes to mind when
they had to go to Biloxi), but we are NOT a failed island.
I've lived in the south for 56 years, and every time I've traveled North,
I saw that we're doing DAMN well, comparatively speaking.
The ONLY depressed places here, are where Democrats have taken over. When
I got to Jackson, MS in 1989, it was still a pretty decent place to live.
Now? Fuhgetaboutit. I moved out to the 'burbs in about 1995 and never
looked back. It's REALLY nice out in the burbs, especially when they
started building out and away from Jackson.
Tearing down statues of the old days and storm troopers enforcing hate
crimes and leftist Socialist dictator typed passing gun laws and turning
the BIG cities into Federal Subsidized Southern plantations for
harvesting votes instead of cotton........ places that most of us drive
around... rather than through.

Hurricanes and the Clinton carpetbagger type FOUNDATIONS coming in and
stealing money and helping no one....

Hell... in Miami where we had Little Havana, there is now a Little Haiti.

AIDS and GAYS in KEY WEST and drugs and crime from Mexico... all over
TEXAS and the SOUTH WEST.

Military guarding borders and lacing razor wire.... all the South needs
now is an EARTH QUAKE and a few more murders and homeless and hurricanes
like the one in the panhandle of Florida that flattened houses so people
can live in tin shacks with no running water or toilets that work.
There's already 3rd world diseases running all over with the Million
illegals per year. Do you think their food preparation is based on the
FDA guidelines, think again. Most have never seen a real toilet or know
to wash their hands.

Democrats hate the South so it's no wonder that they targeted it for
destruction for all of Obama's 8 years and now they use their Obama
government in exile to undermine anything that could help fix the
problems..
--
That's Karma
gordo
2019-04-20 19:02:10 UTC
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On Fri, 19 Apr 2019 15:56:10 -0400, BeamMeUpScotty
Post by BeamMeUpScotty
Post by Stephen Hall
Post by AlleyCat
On 18 Apr 2019 19:17:12 GMT, Stephen Hall says...
Post by Stephen Hall
Post by AlleyCat
Does that excuse Canadian slavery?
Why should there be any excuses?
Ummm... there SHOULDN'T be, that's why I asked THAT particular question.
No help needed, but I appreciate the effort.
Just throwing in my two cents.
You know destroying statues in the Souther United States, is akin to
Haiti where the slaves actually killed and chased away all the former
slave owners..... because they considered everyone evil but the victims.
The slaves escaped slavery and fled to the jungles. Their numbers grew
and grew. They would beat drums at night and the owners became more
afraid and the slaves grew bolder and bolder and many more escaped.
Finally the owners were attacked and killed which was right and
proper. The owners were evil and the slaves were uneducated
Post by BeamMeUpScotty
In the end we see Haiti has been a failing place ever since.
And the part that's scary is that Democrats and Liberals and Leftists
all want to repeat that in the South by destroying statues and
condemning white male heterosexual men.... They've actually been doing
it for decades, is it any wonder that the South is beginning to look a
little like a failed island that has been the symbol of 3rd world
destitution for a century in the Caribbean.
It seems that the mindset that once you get rid of the evil slave owners
the place will be a Utopian paradise is already proven wrong and yet
Democrats Liberals and Marxists try to re-create the same kind of
failure over and over everywhere they go. They're like a disease that
spreads misery.
---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com

Liberals are VERMIN!
2019-04-14 05:51:17 UTC
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And they used to burn witches in Europe and cannibals existed in New Guinea until the 1980s. History. Interesting, but of no consequence today.
Greg Carr
2019-04-14 10:16:57 UTC
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Post by AlleyCat
Black Enslavement in Canada
In early Canada, the enslavement of African peoples was a legal instrument
that helped fuel colonial economic enterprise. Enslavement was introduced
by French colonists in New France in the early 1600s, and lasted until it
was abolished throughout British North America in 1834.
During that two-century period, Canada was involved in the transatlantic
slave trade. Within the country's borders, people were bought, sold and
enslaved. Canada was further linked to the institution of enslavement
through international trade. The country exchanged products such as salted
cod and timber for slave-produced goods such as rum, molasses, tobacco and
sugar from slaveholding colonies in the Caribbean.
ration showing deck plans and cross sections of British slave ship Brookes
under the regulated slave trade act of 1788.
Terminology
There is debate about the terms enslavement and enslaved people, on one
hand, and slavery and slaves on the other. Many authors and historians use
both sets of terms, which have similar meanings but can represent
different perspectives on historical events. For example, slave is used to
describe a person's property. It is a noun that critics of the term say
reduces a person to a position they never chose to be in. The term
enslaved describes the state of being held as a slave. Historians who
prefer enslaved person explain that it makes it clearer that enslavement
was imposed on people against their will. They also mention that adding
the word person brings forward the humanity of the people the term
describes.
Some historians continue to use the terms slave and slavery, without
adding person, arguing that the terms are clearer and more familiar. They
argue that adding the word person implies a level of autonomy that
enslavement took away from people.
Enslavement in New France
In the early 17th century, French colonizers in New France began the
practice of chattel slavery, in which people were treated as personal
property that could be bought, sold, traded and inherited. The first
slaves in New France were Indigenous peoples a large percentage of whom
came from the Pawnee Nation located in present-day Nebraska, Oklahoma and
Kansas. Many were captured during war and sold to other Indigenous nations
or to European traders. Some French colonists acquired enslaved Black
people through private sales, and some received Indigenous and African
slaves as gifts from Indigenous allies. Out of approximately 4,200 slaves
in New France at the peak of slavery, about 2,700 were Indigenous people
who were enslaved until 1783, and at least 1,443 were Black people who
were enslaved between the late 1600s and 1831. The rest of the slaves were
from other territories and other countries. Over time, enslaved people
from any Indigenous group in North America were generally referred to as
panis - a term that became synonymous with "enslaved Indigenous person."
Indigenous and African individuals held in bondage were also commonly
referred to as domestiques or servants - words that almost always meant
slave.
https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/black-enslavement
If you don't like Canada then fly back to Africa on the daily flights. There is no BLM in Vancouver so get the F out.
Dave Smith
2019-04-14 19:49:19 UTC
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Post by Greg Carr
Post by AlleyCat
Black Enslavement in Canada
In early Canada, the enslavement of African peoples was a legal
instrument that helped fuel colonial economic enterprise.
Enslavement was introduced by French colonists in New France in the
early 1600s, and lasted until it was abolished throughout British
North America in 1834.
During that two-century period, Canada was involved in the
transatlantic slave trade. Within the country's borders, people
were bought, sold and enslaved. Canada was further linked to the
institution of enslavement through international trade. The country
exchanged products such as salted cod and timber for slave-produced
goods such as rum, molasses, tobacco and sugar from slaveholding
colonies in the Caribbean.
ration showing deck plans and cross sections of British slave ship
Brookes under the regulated slave trade act of 1788. Terminology
There is debate about the terms enslavement and enslaved people, on
one hand, and slavery and slaves on the other. Many authors and
historians use both sets of terms, which have similar meanings but
can represent different perspectives on historical events. For
example, slave is used to describe a person's property. It is a
noun that critics of the term say reduces a person to a position
they never chose to be in. The term enslaved describes the state of
being held as a slave. Historians who prefer enslaved person
explain that it makes it clearer that enslavement was imposed on
people against their will. They also mention that adding the word
person brings forward the humanity of the people the term
describes.
Some historians continue to use the terms slave and slavery,
without adding person, arguing that the terms are clearer and more
familiar. They argue that adding the word person implies a level of
autonomy that enslavement took away from people. Enslavement in New
France
In the early 17th century, French colonizers in New France began
the practice of chattel slavery, in which people were treated as
personal property that could be bought, sold, traded and inherited.
The first slaves in New France were Indigenous peoples a large
percentage of whom came from the Pawnee Nation located in
present-day Nebraska, Oklahoma and Kansas. Many were captured
during war and sold to other Indigenous nations or to European
traders. Some French colonists acquired enslaved Black people
through private sales, and some received Indigenous and African
slaves as gifts from Indigenous allies. Out of approximately 4,200
slaves in New France at the peak of slavery, about 2,700 were
Indigenous people who were enslaved until 1783, and at least 1,443
were Black people who were enslaved between the late 1600s and
1831. The rest of the slaves were from other territories and other
countries. Over time, enslaved people from any Indigenous group in
North America were generally referred to as panis - a term that
became synonymous with "enslaved Indigenous person." Indigenous and
African individuals held in bondage were also commonly referred to
as domestiques or servants - words that almost always meant slave.
https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/black-enslavement
If you don't like Canada then fly back to Africa on the daily
flights. There is no BLM in Vancouver so get the F out.
That differs from the information I got from a book about slavery in
Canada a few years ago. That source indicated that there had been two
boat loads of African slaves shipped to New France, and it didn't really
work out. Some were purchased in the US, and apparently there were only
a few hundred black slaves. It can hardly have been the fuel of
economic development in early Canada that it was in the US, and it is a
hell of a stretch to claim that Canada as involved in the trans Atlantic
slave trade for 200 years.

After the American revolution some Loyalists came north with slaves, and
it became an issue here. The government acted quickly to solve the
problem. There was too much pressure against freeing slaves, so those
who were brought as slaves remained slaves, but the children born here
were free. While slavery was officially abolished in 1833, there were
very few slaves left.
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