Discussion:
Feb Liberals propose legalizing all now-illegal drugs
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Liberals are VERMIN!
2017-08-11 00:36:06 UTC
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The great conservative William F. Buckley suggested this 20 years ago. For a year, you'd be dragging bodies off the street. But after one year or so, the people predisposed to addiction would all be dead, alleviating the majority of the drug problem.
Eric©
2017-08-11 02:25:55 UTC
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Liberals are VERMIN! wrote...
Post by Liberals are VERMIN!
The great conservative William F. Buckley suggested this 20 years ago. For a year, you'd be dragging bodies off the street. But after one year or so, the people predisposed to addiction would all be dead, alleviating the majority of the drug problem.
Related:

British Columbia looks to Portugal to combat opioid crisis
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/british-columbia/british-columbia-looks-to-portugal-
to-combat-opioid-crisis/article35933393/

https://tgam.ca/2vU8Bf8

I still haven't seen anyone explain in any of these decriminalization/legalization news
stories exactly how these measures will stop people from dying in large numbers. Maybe
they are shy? Or maybe the next step will be for governments to begin supplying high-
quality drugs to those who want them.
Liberals are VERMIN!
2017-08-11 09:19:36 UTC
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Post by Eric©
Liberals are VERMIN! wrote...
Post by Liberals are VERMIN!
The great conservative William F. Buckley suggested this 20 years ago. For a year, you'd be dragging bodies off the street. But after one year or so, the people predisposed to addiction would all be dead, alleviating the majority of the drug problem.
British Columbia looks to Portugal to combat opioid crisis
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/british-columbia/british-columbia-looks-to-portugal-
to-combat-opioid-crisis/article35933393/
https://tgam.ca/2vU8Bf8
I still haven't seen anyone explain in any of these decriminalization/legalization news
stories exactly how these measures will stop people from dying in large numbers. Maybe
they are shy? Or maybe the next step will be for governments to begin supplying high-
quality drugs to those who want them.
There will still be a demand for illegal drugs, they'll undercut the tax-happy government prices (pot) and it'll be like any other contraband. Free drugs? Maybe a segment of the population will never be worth $0.10? Paid-for by the people who produce. Subsidies of these creatures should be predicated on if they agree to sterilization. A predisposition to be an addict is genetic. It should be (no pun) "weeded" out.
Alan Baker
2017-08-11 16:05:06 UTC
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Post by Liberals are VERMIN!
Post by Eric©
Liberals are VERMIN! wrote...
Post by Liberals are VERMIN!
The great conservative William F. Buckley suggested this 20 years ago. For a year, you'd be dragging bodies off the street. But after one year or so, the people predisposed to addiction would all be dead, alleviating the majority of the drug problem.
British Columbia looks to Portugal to combat opioid crisis
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/british-columbia/british-columbia-looks-to-portugal-
to-combat-opioid-crisis/article35933393/
https://tgam.ca/2vU8Bf8
I still haven't seen anyone explain in any of these decriminalization/legalization news
stories exactly how these measures will stop people from dying in large numbers. Maybe
they are shy? Or maybe the next step will be for governments to begin supplying high-
quality drugs to those who want them.
There will still be a demand for illegal drugs, they'll undercut the tax-happy government prices (pot) and it'll be like any other contraband. Free drugs? Maybe a segment of the population will never be worth $0.10? Paid-for by the people who produce. Subsidies of these creatures should be predicated on if they agree to sterilization. A predisposition to be an addict is genetic. It should be (no pun) "weeded" out.
Notice a whole lot of contraband liquor in your world, do you?

No?

Weird.
Greg Carr
2017-08-11 17:28:24 UTC
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Not a lot but I have dealt with bootleggers and booze cans and after hours clubs in the past. Also look at how many legal prescription drugs are sold illegally in the black market.
Alan Baker
2017-08-11 16:04:24 UTC
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Post by Eric©
Liberals are VERMIN! wrote...
Post by Liberals are VERMIN!
The great conservative William F. Buckley suggested this 20 years ago. For a year, you'd be dragging bodies off the street. But after one year or so, the people predisposed to addiction would all be dead, alleviating the majority of the drug problem.
British Columbia looks to Portugal to combat opioid crisis
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/british-columbia/british-columbia-looks-to-portugal-
to-combat-opioid-crisis/article35933393/
https://tgam.ca/2vU8Bf8
I still haven't seen anyone explain in any of these decriminalization/legalization news
stories exactly how these measures will stop people from dying in large numbers. Maybe
they are shy? Or maybe the next step will be for governments to begin supplying high-
quality drugs to those who want them.
They won't stop people who are determined to be idiots from killing
themselves.

NOTHING HAS EVER BEEN ABLE TO STOP THAT.
Eric©
2017-08-11 18:59:27 UTC
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Alan Baker wrote...
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Eric©
Liberals are VERMIN! wrote...
Post by Liberals are VERMIN!
The great conservative William F. Buckley suggested this 20 years ago. For a year, you'd be dragging bodies off the street. But after one year or so, the people predisposed to addiction would all be dead, alleviating the majority of the drug problem.
British Columbia looks to Portugal to combat opioid crisis
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/british-columbia/british-columbia-looks-to-portugal-
to-combat-opioid-crisis/article35933393/
https://tgam.ca/2vU8Bf8
I still haven't seen anyone explain in any of these decriminalization/legalization news
stories exactly how these measures will stop people from dying in large numbers. Maybe
they are shy? Or maybe the next step will be for governments to begin supplying high-
quality drugs to those who want them.
They won't stop people who are determined to be idiots from killing
themselves.
NOTHING HAS EVER BEEN ABLE TO STOP THAT.
I agree. I have no doubt that some of the people paramedics, firefighters, volunteers
etc etc in parts of Vancouver are 'saving' are being saved again and again, until they
eventually join the statistics.
Alan Baker
2017-08-11 19:15:05 UTC
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Post by Eric©
Alan Baker wrote...
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Eric©
Liberals are VERMIN! wrote...
Post by Liberals are VERMIN!
The great conservative William F. Buckley suggested this 20 years ago. For a year, you'd be dragging bodies off the street. But after one year or so, the people predisposed to addiction would all be dead, alleviating the majority of the drug problem.
British Columbia looks to Portugal to combat opioid crisis
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/british-columbia/british-columbia-looks-to-portugal-
to-combat-opioid-crisis/article35933393/
https://tgam.ca/2vU8Bf8
I still haven't seen anyone explain in any of these decriminalization/legalization news
stories exactly how these measures will stop people from dying in large numbers. Maybe
they are shy? Or maybe the next step will be for governments to begin supplying high-
quality drugs to those who want them.
They won't stop people who are determined to be idiots from killing
themselves.
NOTHING HAS EVER BEEN ABLE TO STOP THAT.
I agree. I have no doubt that some of the people paramedics, firefighters, volunteers
etc etc in parts of Vancouver are 'saving' are being saved again and again, until they
eventually join the statistics.
So let's stop trying to prevent people from choosing certain risky
activities.

We don't stop people from skiing, or even back country skiing.

You can go hiking in the mountains... ...in winter... ...without telling
anyone where you'll be or when you are expected back.

You're allowed to go mountain climbing, even free climbing.

It's time to get out of the business of preventing people from making
stupid choices. It's wrong both from philosophical and practical
perspectives.

TAX them for their choices based on solid actuarial data, and let them
have at it.
Enki
2017-08-11 19:28:12 UTC
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Post by Alan Baker
Post by Eric©
Alan Baker wrote...
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Eric©
Liberals are VERMIN! wrote...
Post by Liberals are VERMIN!
The great conservative William F. Buckley suggested this 20 years
ago. For a year, you'd be dragging bodies off the street. But
after one year or so, the people predisposed to addiction would all
be dead, alleviating the majority of the drug problem.
British Columbia looks to Portugal to combat opioid crisis
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/british-columbia/british-columbia-looks-to-portugal-
to-combat-opioid-crisis/article35933393/
https://tgam.ca/2vU8Bf8
I still haven't seen anyone explain in any of these
decriminalization/legalization news
stories exactly how these measures will stop people from dying in
large numbers. Maybe
they are shy? Or maybe the next step will be for governments to
begin supplying high-
quality drugs to those who want them.
They won't stop people who are determined to be idiots from killing
themselves.
NOTHING HAS EVER BEEN ABLE TO STOP THAT.
I agree. I have no doubt that some of the people paramedics,
firefighters, volunteers
etc etc in parts of Vancouver are 'saving' are being saved again and again, until they
eventually join the statistics.
So let's stop trying to prevent people from choosing certain risky
activities.
We don't stop people from skiing, or even back country skiing.
You can go hiking in the mountains... ...in winter... ...without telling
anyone where you'll be or when you are expected back.
You're allowed to go mountain climbing, even free climbing.
It's time to get out of the business of preventing people from making
stupid choices. It's wrong both from philosophical and practical
perspectives.
TAX them for their choices based on solid actuarial data, and let them
have at it.
For example:

https://fishcolorado.com/blog/categories/guide-blog/colorados-search-and-rescue-fee

The truth is, no, you are not completely covered for the cost of an
extraction by helicopter or any other expensive forms of rescue that you
may require. So don't be a dummy and assume, ‘whelp, I'm a little lost
here and its getting dark’, maybe I’ll just call for a chopper, I mean I
am covered by that $0.25 I paid on my fishing license. You will end up
with hefty bill and feeling cheated.

This comes straight from the "horse's mouth": A lovely lady, who’s name
I cannot recollect, came into the shop last season and confirmed that
she was a member of the Summit County Search and Rescue Team. It was
actually she who was in search of the hunting/fishing license. The fee
came up in our small talk conversation and she took the opportunity to
explain where it goes and what it’s for. Here it is, the truth! This
small fee is used to fund the search and rescue operations. Search and
rescue teams are allowed to apply for grants from this fund to acquire
equipment. Last summer season the Summit County Search and Rescue Team
applied for some new ATV’s and they got them.

So there it is folks; think of the Search and Rescue fee as donation
that you are making towards search and rescue. It is not an insurance
policy that the state has created for you to go get lost or injured in
the backcountry. I want to conclude by thanking the person who decided
to discern this small fee from the regular overall price of your license
on the license. In the end the sight of this fee probably just created
more problems than it helped, so, thanks guy.

Jack Yeaton
Cutthroat Angler Guide and Valuable Member of our Shop Staff
Eric©
2017-08-11 20:42:23 UTC
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Alan Baker wrote...
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Eric©
Alan Baker wrote...
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Eric©
Liberals are VERMIN! wrote...
Post by Liberals are VERMIN!
The great conservative William F. Buckley suggested this 20 years ago. For a year, you'd be dragging bodies off the street. But after one year or so, the people predisposed to addiction would all be dead, alleviating the majority of the drug problem.
British Columbia looks to Portugal to combat opioid crisis
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/british-columbia/british-columbia-looks-to-portugal-
to-combat-opioid-crisis/article35933393/
https://tgam.ca/2vU8Bf8
I still haven't seen anyone explain in any of these decriminalization/legalization news
stories exactly how these measures will stop people from dying in large numbers. Maybe
they are shy? Or maybe the next step will be for governments to begin supplying high-
quality drugs to those who want them.
They won't stop people who are determined to be idiots from killing
themselves.
NOTHING HAS EVER BEEN ABLE TO STOP THAT.
I agree. I have no doubt that some of the people paramedics, firefighters, volunteers
etc etc in parts of Vancouver are 'saving' are being saved again and again, until they
eventually join the statistics.
So let's stop trying to prevent people from choosing certain risky
activities.
We don't stop people from skiing, or even back country skiing.
You can go hiking in the mountains... ...in winter... ...without telling
anyone where you'll be or when you are expected back.
You're allowed to go mountain climbing, even free climbing.
It's time to get out of the business of preventing people from making
stupid choices. It's wrong both from philosophical and practical
perspectives.
TAX them for their choices based on solid actuarial data, and let them
have at it.
A climber assumes risks but doesn't generally force a social cost of some kind on other
people. For your idea to work, drug emporiums would have to be open 24/7 and provide
free drugs to people with no money, so that they don't go robbing other people. Of
course it's debatable as to whether having hordes of people panhandling or lying semi-
comatose on the sidewalk is a social cost of drug use or not.
Alan Baker
2017-08-11 21:36:50 UTC
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Post by Eric©
Alan Baker wrote...
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Eric©
Alan Baker wrote...
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Eric©
Liberals are VERMIN! wrote...
Post by Liberals are VERMIN!
The great conservative William F. Buckley suggested this 20 years ago. For a year, you'd be dragging bodies off the street. But after one year or so, the people predisposed to addiction would all be dead, alleviating the majority of the drug problem.
British Columbia looks to Portugal to combat opioid crisis
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/british-columbia/british-columbia-looks-to-portugal-
to-combat-opioid-crisis/article35933393/
https://tgam.ca/2vU8Bf8
I still haven't seen anyone explain in any of these decriminalization/legalization news
stories exactly how these measures will stop people from dying in large numbers. Maybe
they are shy? Or maybe the next step will be for governments to begin supplying high-
quality drugs to those who want them.
They won't stop people who are determined to be idiots from killing
themselves.
NOTHING HAS EVER BEEN ABLE TO STOP THAT.
I agree. I have no doubt that some of the people paramedics, firefighters, volunteers
etc etc in parts of Vancouver are 'saving' are being saved again and again, until they
eventually join the statistics.
So let's stop trying to prevent people from choosing certain risky
activities.
We don't stop people from skiing, or even back country skiing.
You can go hiking in the mountains... ...in winter... ...without telling
anyone where you'll be or when you are expected back.
You're allowed to go mountain climbing, even free climbing.
It's time to get out of the business of preventing people from making
stupid choices. It's wrong both from philosophical and practical
perspectives.
TAX them for their choices based on solid actuarial data, and let them
have at it.
A climber assumes risks but doesn't generally force a social cost of some kind on other
people. For your idea to work, drug emporiums would have to be open 24/7 and provide
free drugs to people with no money, so that they don't go robbing other people. Of
course it's debatable as to whether having hordes of people panhandling or lying semi-
comatose on the sidewalk is a social cost of drug use or not.
People rob other people for drugs BECAUSE A BLACK MARKET MAKES THEM THAT
EXPENSIVE.
Dave Smith
2017-08-11 22:13:30 UTC
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Post by Alan Baker
Post by Eric©
Alan Baker wrote...
A climber assumes risks but doesn't generally force a social cost of some kind on other
people. For your idea to work, drug emporiums would have to be open 24/7 and provide
free drugs to people with no money, so that they don't go robbing other people. Of
course it's debatable as to whether having hordes of people
panhandling or lying semi-
comatose on the sidewalk is a social cost of drug use or not.
People rob other people for drugs BECAUSE A BLACK MARKET MAKES THEM THAT
EXPENSIVE.
That is true. However, the craving for the drug makes people desperate
enough to resort to crime. AFAIAC, legalize and educate and let some of
them fall through the cracks.
Enki
2017-08-12 17:15:58 UTC
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Post by Dave Smith
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Eric©
Alan Baker wrote...
A climber assumes risks but doesn't generally force a social cost of some kind on other
people. For your idea to work, drug emporiums would have to be open 24/7 and provide
free drugs to people with no money, so that they don't go robbing other people. Of
course it's debatable as to whether having hordes of people
panhandling or lying semi-
comatose on the sidewalk is a social cost of drug use or not.
People rob other people for drugs BECAUSE A BLACK MARKET MAKES THEM
THAT EXPENSIVE.
That is true.
No that is an oversimplification.

Eg:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/04/03/cigarette-smuggling-new-york-_n_5041823.html
Inside New York City’s Dangerous, Multimillion-Dollar Cigarette Black Market
Post by Dave Smith
However, the craving for the drug makes people desperate
enough to resort to crime.
True.
Post by Dave Smith
AFAIAC, legalize and educate and let some of
them fall through the cracks.
No sane person would legalize meth, ice, or heroin.

Period.
Dave Smith
2017-08-12 18:25:54 UTC
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Post by Enki
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Alan Baker
People rob other people for drugs BECAUSE A BLACK MARKET MAKES THEM
THAT EXPENSIVE.
That is true.
No that is an oversimplification.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/04/03/cigarette-smuggling-new-york-_n_5041823.html
Inside New York City’s Dangerous, Multimillion-Dollar Cigarette Black Market
That is not a valid comparison because you are talking about a legal but
heavily taxed profit and people smuggling them across state lines. The
penalties for smuggling, trafficking and possessing illegal drugs are a
lot stiffer, and the higher risk pushes the prices up.
Post by Enki
Post by Dave Smith
However, the craving for the drug makes people desperate enough to
resort to crime.
True.
Post by Dave Smith
AFAIAC, legalize and educate and let some of them fall through the
cracks.
No sane person would legalize meth, ice, or heroin.
Period.
Many said the same about alcohol 100 years ago. The US brought in a
constitutional amendment to ban the production, transport and sale of
alcoholic beverages, but that was later repealed. It had led to a slight
reduction in the sorts of crimes associated with alcohol, like fighting
and spousal abuse, but there was in increase in more violent crimes
associated with the production, smuggling and distribution of alcohol.
It made a lot of money for a lot of mobsters and the government had to
admit that it had been a complete failure.


Almost half the inmates in American prisons are there for drug offences.
If there was violence connected to their drug related behaviour they
could have been sentenced for that. If the jails were half filled with
pot smokers there would be space in them for real criminals.
Enki
2017-08-12 18:34:49 UTC
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Post by Dave Smith
Post by Enki
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Alan Baker
People rob other people for drugs BECAUSE A BLACK MARKET MAKES THEM
THAT EXPENSIVE.
That is true.
No that is an oversimplification.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/04/03/cigarette-smuggling-new-york-_n_5041823.html
Inside New York City’s Dangerous, Multimillion-Dollar Cigarette Black Market
That is not a valid comparison because you are talking about a legal but
heavily taxed profit and people smuggling them across state lines. The
penalties for smuggling, trafficking and possessing illegal drugs are a
lot stiffer, and the higher risk pushes the prices up.
Yes it IS a valid comparison.

Just as opioid addiction fueled lower cost heroin use.
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Enki
Post by Dave Smith
However, the craving for the drug makes people desperate enough to
resort to crime.
True.
Post by Dave Smith
AFAIAC, legalize and educate and let some of them fall through the
cracks.
No sane person would legalize meth, ice, or heroin.
Period.
Many said the same about alcohol 100 years ago.
Alcohol is not even remotely comparable to meth, ice or heroin.

How dense are yoiu?
Post by Dave Smith
The US brought in a
constitutional amendment to ban the production, transport and sale of
alcoholic beverages, but that was later repealed. It had led to a slight
reduction in the sorts of crimes associated with alcohol, like fighting
and spousal abuse, but there was in increase in more violent crimes
associated with the production, smuggling and distribution of alcohol.
It made a lot of money for a lot of mobsters and the government had to
admit that it had been a complete failure.
All true.
Post by Dave Smith
Almost half the inmates in American prisons are there for drug offences.
If there was violence connected to their drug related behaviour they
could have been sentenced for that. If the jails were half filled with
pot smokers there would be space in them for real criminals.
Pot is benign, largely.

Meth, ice and heroin are NOT.

Prohibition saw only one minor competitor to alcohol - marijuana.

The opium dens were long gone.

Heroin was medicinally expensive and rare.

And meth and ice did not exist.

You're mixing eras and chemistry in a way that makes an unhealthy
mocktail of ideas devoid of valid linkages.
Dave Smith
2017-08-12 21:42:35 UTC
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Post by Enki
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Enki
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Alan Baker
People rob other people for drugs BECAUSE A BLACK MARKET MAKES THEM
THAT EXPENSIVE.
That is true.
No that is an oversimplification.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/04/03/cigarette-smuggling-new-york-_n_5041823.html
Inside New York City’s Dangerous, Multimillion-Dollar Cigarette Black Market
That is not a valid comparison because you are talking about a legal
but heavily taxed profit and people smuggling them across state lines.
The penalties for smuggling, trafficking and possessing illegal drugs
are a lot stiffer, and the higher risk pushes the prices up.
Yes it IS a valid comparison.
Just as opioid addiction fueled lower cost heroin use.
All illegal drug prices have been dropping over the last few years.
Post by Enki
Post by Dave Smith
Many said the same about alcohol 100 years ago.
Alcohol is not even remotely comparable to meth, ice or heroin.
How dense are yoiu?
[sic]

Really? You pose a comment like that and then suggest that I am the one
who is dense? Alcohol is responsible for more health, personal, family
social and career problems than all the illegal drugs combined.
Post by Enki
Post by Dave Smith
The US brought in a constitutional amendment to ban the production,
transport and sale of alcoholic beverages, but that was later
repealed. It had led to a slight reduction in the sorts of crimes
associated with alcohol, like fighting and spousal abuse, but there
was in increase in more violent crimes associated with the production,
smuggling and distribution of alcohol. It made a lot of money for a
lot of mobsters and the government had to admit that it had been a
complete failure.
All true.
Post by Dave Smith
Almost half the inmates in American prisons are there for drug
offences. If there was violence connected to their drug related
behaviour they could have been sentenced for that. If the jails were
half filled with pot smokers there would be space in them for real
criminals.
Pot is benign, largely.
Meth, ice and heroin are NOT.
Prohibition saw only one minor competitor to alcohol - marijuana.
Okay. I see. You're just making this shit up.
Enki
2017-08-12 23:24:36 UTC
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Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Enki
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Enki
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Alan Baker
People rob other people for drugs BECAUSE A BLACK MARKET MAKES
THEM THAT EXPENSIVE.
That is true.
No that is an oversimplification.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/04/03/cigarette-smuggling-new-york-_n_5041823.html
Inside New York City’s Dangerous, Multimillion-Dollar Cigarette Black Market
That is not a valid comparison because you are talking about a legal
but heavily taxed profit and people smuggling them across state
lines. The penalties for smuggling, trafficking and possessing
illegal drugs are a lot stiffer, and the higher risk pushes the
prices up.
Yes it IS a valid comparison.
Just as opioid addiction fueled lower cost heroin use.
All illegal drug prices have been dropping over the last few years.
Yes.
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Enki
Post by Dave Smith
Many said the same about alcohol 100 years ago.
Alcohol is not even remotely comparable to meth, ice or heroin.
How dense are yoiu?
[sic]
Oh forgive me for fat fingering betwixt keys!
Post by Dave Smith
Really? You pose a comment like that and then suggest that I am the one
who is dense? Alcohol is responsible for more health, personal, family
social and career problems than all the illegal drugs combined.
Due to the VOLUME of it consumed and the wide availability and legality
of it, duh!

Now remind me why we should legalize meth...
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Enki
Post by Dave Smith
The US brought in a constitutional amendment to ban the production,
transport and sale of alcoholic beverages, but that was later
repealed. It had led to a slight reduction in the sorts of crimes
associated with alcohol, like fighting and spousal abuse, but there
was in increase in more violent crimes associated with the
production, smuggling and distribution of alcohol. It made a lot of
money for a lot of mobsters and the government had to admit that it
had been a complete failure.
All true.
Post by Dave Smith
Almost half the inmates in American prisons are there for drug
offences. If there was violence connected to their drug related
behaviour they could have been sentenced for that. If the jails were
half filled with pot smokers there would be space in them for real
criminals.
Pot is benign, largely.
Meth, ice and heroin are NOT.
Prohibition saw only one minor competitor to alcohol - marijuana.
Okay. I see. You're just making this shit up.
No, I'm not:

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/drugs/buyers/socialhistory.html

Between 1850 and 1937 marijuana was widely used throughout United States
as a medicinal drug and could easily be purchased in pharmacies and
general stores. Recreational use was limited in the US until after the
Mexican Revolution of 1910, when an influx of Mexican immigrants
introduced the habit. The Volstead Act of 1920, which raised the price
of alcohol in the United States, positioned marijuana as an attractive
alternative and led to an increase in use of the drug. "Tea pads," where
a person could purchase marijuana for 25 cents or less, began appearing
in cities across the United States, particularly as part of the black
"hepster" jazz culture.
Dave Smith
2017-08-12 23:36:54 UTC
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Post by Enki
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Enki
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Enki
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/04/03/cigarette-smuggling-new-york-_n_5041823.html
Inside New York City’s Dangerous, Multimillion-Dollar Cigarette Black Market
All illegal drug prices have been dropping over the last few years.
Yes.
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Enki
Post by Dave Smith
Many said the same about alcohol 100 years ago.
Alcohol is not even remotely comparable to meth, ice or heroin.
How dense are yoiu?
[sic]
Oh forgive me for fat fingering betwixt keys!
What can I say? When you think that you can win an argument by calling
someone else dense you have to have higher standards.
Enki
2017-08-13 15:18:37 UTC
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Post by Dave Smith
Post by Enki
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Enki
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Enki
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/04/03/cigarette-smuggling-new-york-_n_5041823.html
Inside New York City’s Dangerous, Multimillion-Dollar Cigarette Black Market
All illegal drug prices have been dropping over the last few years.
Yes.
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Enki
Post by Dave Smith
Many said the same about alcohol 100 years ago.
Alcohol is not even remotely comparable to meth, ice or heroin.
How dense are yoiu?
[sic]
Oh forgive me for fat fingering betwixt keys!
What can I say? When you think that you can win an argument by calling
someone else dense you have to have higher standards.
Then you go right out and prove me right, oh dense one.
Post by Dave Smith
Really? You pose a comment like that and then suggest that I am the
one who is dense? Alcohol is responsible for more health, personal,
family social and career problems than all the illegal drugs
combined.
Due to the VOLUME of it consumed and the wide availability and legality
of it, duh!

Now remind me why we should legalize meth...
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Enki
Prohibition saw only one minor competitor to alcohol - marijuana.
Okay. I see. You're just making this shit up.
No, I'm not:

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/drugs/buyers/socialhistory.html

Between 1850 and 1937 marijuana was widely used throughout United States
as a medicinal drug and could easily be purchased in pharmacies and
general stores. Recreational use was limited in the US until after the
Mexican Revolution of 1910, when an influx of Mexican immigrants
introduced the habit. The Volstead Act of 1920, which raised the price
of alcohol in the United States, positioned marijuana as an attractive
alternative and led to an increase in use of the drug. "Tea pads," where
a person could purchase marijuana for 25 cents or less, began appearing
in cities across the United States, particularly as part of the black
"hepster" jazz culture.


Ya see densoid, the real meat of the debate never goes away!
Post by Dave Smith
crickets<
Enki
2017-08-12 17:13:34 UTC
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Post by Alan Baker
People rob other people for drugs BECAUSE A BLACK MARKET MAKES THEM THAT
EXPENSIVE.
No...they do it because they are craven addicts who care nothing for the
law.


Nice of you to identify your peer group, scumbag.
Alan Baker
2017-08-13 04:17:41 UTC
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Post by Enki
Post by Alan Baker
People rob other people for drugs BECAUSE A BLACK MARKET MAKES THEM
THAT EXPENSIVE.
No...they do it because they are craven addicts who care nothing for the
law.
No. You are completely and utterly wrong.

There are people addicted to alcohol, but they don't have to rob to feed
their addiction.

Game, set, and matach.
Post by Enki
Nice of you to identify your peer group, scumbag.
Enki
2017-08-13 15:27:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Enki
Post by Alan Baker
People rob other people for drugs BECAUSE A BLACK MARKET MAKES THEM
THAT EXPENSIVE.
No...they do it because they are craven addicts who care nothing for
the law.
No. You are completely and utterly wrong.
No, I am not!
Post by Alan Baker
There are people addicted to alcohol, but they don't have to rob to feed
their addiction.
Yes they do.

Do you really think alky's don't commit crime or steel 6 packs?

https://www.ncadd.org/about-addiction/addiction-update/alcohol-drugs-and-crime

Because alcohol use is legal and pervasive, it plays a particularly
strong role in the relationship to crime and other social problems.
Alcohol is a factor in 40% of all violent crimes today, and according to
the Department of Justice, 37% of almost 2 million convicted offenders
currently in jail, report that they were drinking at the time of their
arrest.

Alcohol, more than any illegal drug, was found to be closely associated
with violent crimes, including murder, rape, assault, child and spousal
abuse. About 3 million violent crimes occur each year in which victims
perceive the offender to have been drinking and statistics related to
alcohol use by violent offenders generally show that about half of all
homicides and assaults are committed when the offender, victim, or both
have been drinking. Among violent crimes, with the exception of
robberies, the offender is far more likely to have been drinking than
under the influence of other drugs.

Alcohol is often a factor in violence where the attacker and the victim
know each other. Two-thirds of victims who were attacked by an intimate
(including a current or former spouse, boyfriend or girlfriend) reported
that alcohol had been involved, and only 31% of victimizations by
strangers are alcohol-related. Nearly 500,000 incidents between
intimates involve offenders who have been drinking; in addition, 118,000
incidents of family violence (excluding spouses) involve alcohol, as do
744,000 incidents among acquaintances.
Post by Alan Baker
Game, set, and matach.
Sober up, sot.
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Enki
Nice of you to identify your peer group, scumbag.
Eric©
2017-08-15 02:50:23 UTC
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Alan Baker wrote...
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Eric©
Alan Baker wrote...
A climber assumes risks but doesn't generally force a social cost of some kind on other
people. For your idea to work, drug emporiums would have to be open 24/7 and provide
free drugs to people with no money, so that they don't go robbing other people. Of
course it's debatable as to whether having hordes of people panhandling or lying semi-
comatose on the sidewalk is a social cost of drug use or not.
People rob other people for drugs BECAUSE A BLACK MARKET MAKES THEM THAT
EXPENSIVE.
LOL!
Alan Baker
2017-08-15 03:01:19 UTC
Reply
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Post by Eric©
Alan Baker wrote...
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Eric©
Alan Baker wrote...
A climber assumes risks but doesn't generally force a social cost of some kind on
other
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Eric©
people. For your idea to work, drug emporiums would have to be open 24/7 and provide
free drugs to people with no money, so that they don't go robbing other people. Of
course it's debatable as to whether having hordes of people panhandling or lying semi-
comatose on the sidewalk is a social cost of drug use or not.
People rob other people for drugs BECAUSE A BLACK MARKET MAKES THEM THAT
EXPENSIVE.
LOL!
Sorry, but that's what happens.

Prohibition: perhaps you've heard of it.
Enki
2017-08-15 15:11:11 UTC
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Post by Alan Baker
Prohibition: perhaps you've heard of it.
Opioid addiction, perhaps you are.
Greg Carr
2017-08-11 21:00:31 UTC
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Raw Message
Tax the junkies? Never met one in stir or a homeless shelter that paid income taxes. And if you tax the opioids the smugglers will undercut you like they do with the cigarets.
Alan Baker
2017-08-11 21:37:21 UTC
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Post by Greg Carr
Tax the junkies? Never met one in stir or a homeless shelter that paid income taxes. And if you tax the opioids the smugglers will undercut you like they do with the cigarets.
Really?

How many people bother to buy smuggled cigarettes, do you think?
Dave Smith
2017-08-11 22:15:40 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Greg Carr
Tax the junkies? Never met one in stir or a homeless shelter that paid
income taxes. And if you tax the opioids the smugglers will undercut
you like they do with the cigarets.
Really?
How many people bother to buy smuggled cigarettes, do you think?
That depends on the availability. Seems to me a few years back the
government backed off on some of their punitive taxation on tobacco
because cigarette smuggling through native reserves was becoming a major
problem. That should be read as so many people were buying smuggled
cigarettes that the government was losing tax revenue.
Alan Baker
2017-08-12 05:07:25 UTC
Reply
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Post by Dave Smith
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Greg Carr
Tax the junkies? Never met one in stir or a homeless shelter that
paid income taxes. And if you tax the opioids the smugglers will
undercut you like they do with the cigarets.
Really?
How many people bother to buy smuggled cigarettes, do you think?
That depends on the availability. Seems to me a few years back the
government backed off on some of their punitive taxation on tobacco
because cigarette smuggling through native reserves was becoming a major
problem. That should be read as so many people were buying smuggled
cigarettes that the government was losing tax revenue.
Yup.

But they currently still have a LOT of tax in the price of cigarettes.

There's just a number beyond which they will not go.
Enki
2017-08-12 17:29:44 UTC
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Post by Alan Baker
But they currently still have a LOT of tax in the price of cigarettes.
There's just a number beyond which they will not go.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/04/03/cigarette-smuggling-new-york-_n_5041823.html


Inside New York City’s Dangerous, Multimillion-Dollar Cigarette Black Market
Byker
2017-08-13 15:42:04 UTC
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"A law that year in New York ended the ability of Native American tribes
to sell non-taxed cigarettes to non-tribe members."
It's supposed to that way in Oklahoma, but here in the Sooner State just
about everyone is part Indian. Race is irrelevant. The only color that
matters is GREEN.

And to think, just twenty years ago I could hop on my bike and make the
60-mile round trip to the Cheyenne Arapaho Smoke Shop
(http://tinyurl.com/y8b3wbcz) on one gallon of gas, and with $100 I could
buy ten cartons of Basic Menthol 100s and a log of Skoal, and have change
coming back...
Enki
2017-08-12 17:16:18 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Greg Carr
Tax the junkies? Never met one in stir or a homeless shelter that
paid income taxes. And if you tax the opioids the smugglers will
undercut you like they do with the cigarets.
Really?
How many people bother to buy smuggled cigarettes, do you think?
That depends on the availability.
Oh?

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/04/03/cigarette-smuggling-new-york-_n_5041823.html
Greg Carr
2017-08-11 23:56:14 UTC
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Raw Message
I dont smoke but from time to time when I work I run into ppl who buy illegal smokes or sell them. I have seen a couple of documentaries on the subject and newspaper articles so scores of millions must be involved.
Enki
2017-08-12 17:14:35 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Greg Carr
Tax the junkies? Never met one in stir or a homeless shelter that paid
income taxes. And if you tax the opioids the smugglers will undercut
you like they do with the cigarets.
Really?
How many people bother to buy smuggled cigarettes, do you think?
Are you out of touch with reality?


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/04/03/cigarette-smuggling-new-york-_n_5041823.html

Inside New York City’s Dangerous, Multimillion-Dollar Cigarette Black Market
Alan Baker
2017-08-13 04:18:38 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
Post by Enki
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Greg Carr
Tax the junkies? Never met one in stir or a homeless shelter that
paid income taxes. And if you tax the opioids the smugglers will
undercut you like they do with the cigarets.
Really?
How many people bother to buy smuggled cigarettes, do you think?
Are you out of touch with reality?
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/04/03/cigarette-smuggling-new-york-_n_5041823.html
Inside New York City’s Dangerous, Multimillion-Dollar Cigarette Black Market
Sorry, but I don't read your cites from end to end to find what you
claim is there.

What percentage of the cigarette business in NYC is that?
Enki
2017-08-13 15:29:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Enki
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Greg Carr
Tax the junkies? Never met one in stir or a homeless shelter that
paid income taxes. And if you tax the opioids the smugglers will
undercut you like they do with the cigarets.
Really?
How many people bother to buy smuggled cigarettes, do you think?
Are you out of touch with reality?
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/04/03/cigarette-smuggling-new-york-_n_5041823.html
Inside New York City’s Dangerous, Multimillion-Dollar Cigarette Black Market
Sorry, but I don't read
I know, it's why you're a laughing stock here.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2014/06/25/why-the-massive-black-market-trade-in-cigarettes-affects-you-even-if-you-dont-smoke/?utm_term=.62a4e1ea366c

https://www.bostonglobe.com/ideas/2014/02/02/boston-black-market-cigarette-problem/mJpfuuFZXXYxrBiEgTcyJM/story.html

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=129934561

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/politics/10614206/Cigarette-plain-packaging-fuelling-black-market.html

https://taxfoundation.org/cigarette-taxes-and-cigarette-smuggling-state

Key Findings

Large differentials in cigarette taxes across states create incentives
for black market sales.
Smuggled cigarettes make up substantial portions of cigarette
consumption in many states, and greater than 25 percent of consumption
in twelve states.
The highest inbound cigarette smuggling rates are in New York (56.9
percent), Arizona (51.5 percent), New Mexico (48.1 percent), Washington
(48 percent), and Wisconsin (34.6 percent).
The highest outbound smuggling rates are in New Hampshire (24.2
percent), Wyoming (22.3 percent), Idaho (21.3 percent), Virginia (21.1
percent), and Delaware (20.9 percent).
Cigarette tax rates increased in 30 states and the District of Columbia
between 2006 and 2012.
Public policies often have unintended consequences that outweigh their
benefits. One consequence of high state cigarette tax rates has been
increased smuggling as criminals procure discounted packs from low-tax
states to sell in high-tax states. Growing cigarette tax differentials
have made cigarette smuggling both a national problem and a lucrative
criminal enterprise.
Dave Smith
2017-08-11 21:53:48 UTC
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Post by Eric©
Alan Baker wrote...
I agree. I have no doubt that some of the people paramedics,
firefighters, volunteers etc etc in parts of Vancouver are 'saving'
are being saved again and again, until they eventually join the
statistics.
That's basically the story I heard on the radio the other day from
someone who works in a safe injection site. They have had to treat a
number of people for overdoses, and they are often dealing with the same
people over and over. Some of them have been treated twice a week or more.

I still question the wisdom of government run "safe injection sites".
They can't be very safe if they have to have medical staff and antidotes
on hand. They are naive to think that the junkies who attend are not
shooting up anywhere else and that they are getting high only at those
sites. As far as I am concerned, it serves only to legitimize the use
of illegal and dangerous drugs. Vancouver was among the first to open so
called safe injection sites, but it has experienced a spike in
overdoses. In the first four months of this year they saw 144 fatal
overdoses and the expect to have more than the 965 fatal overdoses they
had last year.
Greg Carr
2017-08-12 00:06:33 UTC
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There are now 4 legal shooting galleries in the Lower Mainland. We of course lead Canada in OD's as a result. They want to remove the stigma from IV drug use just imagine how high
the addiction and OD rate will get if that happens.

"Never trust a junkie"-Ministry
Alan Baker
2017-08-13 04:16:48 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Greg Carr
There are now 4 legal shooting galleries in the Lower Mainland. We of course lead Canada in OD's as a result. They want to remove the stigma from IV drug use just imagine how high
the addiction and OD rate will get if that happens.
OK...

So what?

Why is an drug addict's way of risking his life less valid than any
other thrill seeker's?
Post by Greg Carr
"Never trust a junkie"-Ministry
Enki
2017-08-13 15:24:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Greg Carr
There are now 4 legal shooting galleries in the Lower Mainland. We of
course lead Canada in OD's as a result. They want to remove the stigma
from IV drug use just imagine how high
the addiction and OD rate will get if that happens.
OK...
So what?
Why is an drug addict's way of risking his life less valid than any
other thrill seeker's?
Because they imperil the innocent, seed crime, ruin society.

Like YOU, shitbag.
Dave Smith
2017-08-13 15:34:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Enki
Post by Alan Baker
Why is an drug addict's way of risking his life less valid than any
other thrill seeker's?
Because they imperil the innocent, seed crime, ruin society.
How does someone's addiction to a drug seed crime? Opiates are cheap to
produce and it would cost peanuts to keep someone high on drugs if they
could do it legally. Heroin can be bought for $2 per gram in
Afghanistan, where much of it is produced, but it costs $200 per gram in
the US. It is the criminal status of it and the risk taken by black
marketeers that drives up the price to the point where people have to
rob and steal to get the money for their habit.
Post by Enki
Like YOU, shitbag.
Wow. You already lame argument just went form inept to fucking retarded.
Enki
2017-08-13 16:43:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Enki
Post by Alan Baker
Why is an drug addict's way of risking his life less valid than any
other thrill seeker's?
Because they imperil the innocent, seed crime, ruin society.
How does someone's addiction to a drug seed crime?
Stop avoiding the citations and you'll know, ya dumb fuck canuck!


https://www.ncadd.org/about-addiction/addiction-update/alcohol-drugs-and-crime

Because alcohol use is legal and pervasive, it plays a particularly
strong role in the relationship to crime and other social problems.
Alcohol is a factor in 40% of all violent crimes today, and according to
the Department of Justice, 37% of almost 2 million convicted offenders
currently in jail, report that they were drinking at the time of their
arrest.

Alcohol, more than any illegal drug, was found to be closely associated
with violent crimes, including murder, rape, assault, child and spousal
abuse. About 3 million violent crimes occur each year in which victims
perceive the offender to have been drinking and statistics related to
alcohol use by violent offenders generally show that about half of all
homicides and assaults are committed when the offender, victim, or both
have been drinking. Among violent crimes, with the exception of
robberies, the offender is far more likely to have been drinking than
under the influence of other drugs.

Alcohol is often a factor in violence where the attacker and the victim
know each other. Two-thirds of victims who were attacked by an intimate
(including a current or former spouse, boyfriend or girlfriend) reported
that alcohol had been involved, and only 31% of victimizations by
strangers are alcohol-related. Nearly 500,000 incidents between
intimates involve offenders who have been drinking; in addition, 118,000
incidents of family violence (excluding spouses) involve alcohol, as do
744,000 incidents among acquaintances.
Post by Dave Smith
Opiates are cheap to
produce and it would cost peanuts to keep someone high on drugs if they
could do it legally. Heroin can be bought for $2 per gram in
Afghanistan, where much of it is produced, but it costs $200 per gram in
the US. It is the criminal status of it and the risk taken by black
marketeers that drives up the price to the point where people have to
rob and steal to get the money for their habit.
Just what we need, a populace DOPED out on cheap legal drugs.

WTF is wrong with you anyway?

You spent your life hassling truckers and this is the best you can offer!
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Enki
Like YOU, shitbag.
Wow. You already lame argument just went form inept to fucking retarded.
Eat my ass, cunt.
Dhu on Gate
2017-08-17 18:29:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Enki
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Enki
Post by Alan Baker
Why is an drug addict's way of risking his life less valid than any
other thrill seeker's?
Because they imperil the innocent, seed crime, ruin society.
How does someone's addiction to a drug seed crime?
Stop avoiding the citations and you'll know, ya dumb fuck canuck!
https://www.ncadd.org/about-addiction/addiction-update/alcohol-drugs-and-crime
Because alcohol use is legal and pervasive, it plays a particularly
strong role in the relationship to crime and other social problems.
Alcohol is a factor in 40% of all violent crimes today, and according to
the Department of Justice, 37% of almost 2 million convicted offenders
currently in jail, report that they were drinking at the time of their
arrest.
Alcohol, more than any illegal drug, was found to be closely associated
with violent crimes, including murder, rape, assault, child and spousal
abuse. About 3 million violent crimes occur each year in which victims
perceive the offender to have been drinking and statistics related to
alcohol use by violent offenders generally show that about half of all
homicides and assaults are committed when the offender, victim, or both
have been drinking. Among violent crimes, with the exception of
robberies, the offender is far more likely to have been drinking than
under the influence of other drugs.
Alcohol is often a factor in violence where the attacker and the victim
know each other. Two-thirds of victims who were attacked by an intimate
(including a current or former spouse, boyfriend or girlfriend) reported
that alcohol had been involved, and only 31% of victimizations by
strangers are alcohol-related. Nearly 500,000 incidents between
intimates involve offenders who have been drinking; in addition, 118,000
incidents of family violence (excluding spouses) involve alcohol, as do
744,000 incidents among acquaintances.
Post by Dave Smith
Opiates are cheap to
produce and it would cost peanuts to keep someone high on drugs if they
could do it legally. Heroin can be bought for $2 per gram in
Afghanistan, where much of it is produced, but it costs $200 per gram in
the US. It is the criminal status of it and the risk taken by black
marketeers that drives up the price to the point where people have to
rob and steal to get the money for their habit.
Just what we need, a populace DOPED out on cheap legal drugs.
WTF is wrong with you anyway?
You spent your life hassling truckers and this is the best you can offer!
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Enki
Like YOU, shitbag.
Wow. You already lame argument just went form inept to fucking retarded.
Eat my ass, cunt.
Gimme a stick and a fire, and I will.

Dhu
--
Je suis Canadien. Ce n'est pas Francais ou Anglaise.
C'est une esp`ece de sauvage: ne obliviscaris, vix ea nostra voco;-)

http://babayaga.neotext.ca/PublicKeys/Duncan_Patton_a_Campbell_pubkey.txt
Enki
2017-08-17 18:34:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dhu on Gate
Post by Enki
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Enki
Post by Alan Baker
Why is an drug addict's way of risking his life less valid than any
other thrill seeker's?
Because they imperil the innocent, seed crime, ruin society.
How does someone's addiction to a drug seed crime?
Stop avoiding the citations and you'll know, ya dumb fuck canuck!
https://www.ncadd.org/about-addiction/addiction-update/alcohol-drugs-and-crime
Because alcohol use is legal and pervasive, it plays a particularly
strong role in the relationship to crime and other social problems.
Alcohol is a factor in 40% of all violent crimes today, and according to
the Department of Justice, 37% of almost 2 million convicted offenders
currently in jail, report that they were drinking at the time of their
arrest.
Alcohol, more than any illegal drug, was found to be closely associated
with violent crimes, including murder, rape, assault, child and spousal
abuse. About 3 million violent crimes occur each year in which victims
perceive the offender to have been drinking and statistics related to
alcohol use by violent offenders generally show that about half of all
homicides and assaults are committed when the offender, victim, or both
have been drinking. Among violent crimes, with the exception of
robberies, the offender is far more likely to have been drinking than
under the influence of other drugs.
Alcohol is often a factor in violence where the attacker and the victim
know each other. Two-thirds of victims who were attacked by an intimate
(including a current or former spouse, boyfriend or girlfriend) reported
that alcohol had been involved, and only 31% of victimizations by
strangers are alcohol-related. Nearly 500,000 incidents between
intimates involve offenders who have been drinking; in addition, 118,000
incidents of family violence (excluding spouses) involve alcohol, as do
744,000 incidents among acquaintances.
Post by Dave Smith
Opiates are cheap to
produce and it would cost peanuts to keep someone high on drugs if they
could do it legally. Heroin can be bought for $2 per gram in
Afghanistan, where much of it is produced, but it costs $200 per gram in
the US. It is the criminal status of it and the risk taken by black
marketeers that drives up the price to the point where people have to
rob and steal to get the money for their habit.
Just what we need, a populace DOPED out on cheap legal drugs.
WTF is wrong with you anyway?
You spent your life hassling truckers and this is the best you can offer!
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Enki
Like YOU, shitbag.
Wow. You already lame argument just went form inept to fucking retarded.
Eat my ass, cunt.
Gimme a stick and a fire, and I will.
Dhu
You'll be wearign that stick in your eye, shitbag!
Dhu on Gate
2017-08-17 18:42:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Enki
Post by Dhu on Gate
Post by Enki
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Enki
Post by Alan Baker
Why is an drug addict's way of risking his life less valid than any
other thrill seeker's?
Because they imperil the innocent, seed crime, ruin society.
How does someone's addiction to a drug seed crime?
Stop avoiding the citations and you'll know, ya dumb fuck canuck!
https://www.ncadd.org/about-addiction/addiction-update/alcohol-drugs-
and-crime
Post by Enki
Post by Dhu on Gate
Post by Enki
Because alcohol use is legal and pervasive, it plays a particularly
strong role in the relationship to crime and other social problems.
Alcohol is a factor in 40% of all violent crimes today, and according
to the Department of Justice, 37% of almost 2 million convicted
offenders currently in jail, report that they were drinking at the
time of their arrest.
Alcohol, more than any illegal drug, was found to be closely
associated with violent crimes, including murder, rape, assault, child
and spousal abuse. About 3 million violent crimes occur each year in
which victims perceive the offender to have been drinking and
statistics related to alcohol use by violent offenders generally show
that about half of all homicides and assaults are committed when the
offender, victim, or both have been drinking. Among violent crimes,
with the exception of robberies, the offender is far more likely to
have been drinking than under the influence of other drugs.
Alcohol is often a factor in violence where the attacker and the
victim know each other. Two-thirds of victims who were attacked by an
intimate (including a current or former spouse, boyfriend or
girlfriend) reported that alcohol had been involved, and only 31% of
victimizations by strangers are alcohol-related. Nearly 500,000
incidents between intimates involve offenders who have been drinking;
in addition, 118,000 incidents of family violence (excluding spouses)
involve alcohol, as do 744,000 incidents among acquaintances.
Post by Dave Smith
Opiates are cheap to produce and it would cost peanuts to keep
someone high on drugs if they could do it legally. Heroin can be
bought for $2 per gram in Afghanistan, where much of it is produced,
but it costs $200 per gram in the US. It is the criminal status of it
and the risk taken by black marketeers that drives up the price to
the point where people have to rob and steal to get the money for
their habit.
Just what we need, a populace DOPED out on cheap legal drugs.
WTF is wrong with you anyway?
You spent your life hassling truckers and this is the best you can offer!
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Enki
Like YOU, shitbag.
Wow. You already lame argument just went form inept to fucking retarded.
Eat my ass, cunt.
Gimme a stick and a fire, and I will.
Dhu
You'll be wearign that stick in your eye, shitbag!
Wearging it eh?

Dhu
--
Je suis Canadien. Ce n'est pas Francais ou Anglaise.
C'est une esp`ece de sauvage: ne obliviscaris, vix ea nostra voco;-)

http://babayaga.neotext.ca/PublicKeys/Duncan_Patton_a_Campbell_pubkey.txt
Enki
2017-08-17 18:47:15 UTC
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Post by Enki
Post by Enki
Post by Dhu on Gate
Post by Enki
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Enki
Post by Alan Baker
Why is an drug addict's way of risking his life less valid than any
other thrill seeker's?
Because they imperil the innocent, seed crime, ruin society.
How does someone's addiction to a drug seed crime?
Stop avoiding the citations and you'll know, ya dumb fuck canuck!
https://www.ncadd.org/about-addiction/addiction-update/alcohol-drugs-
and-crime
Post by Enki
Post by Dhu on Gate
Post by Enki
Because alcohol use is legal and pervasive, it plays a particularly
strong role in the relationship to crime and other social problems.
Alcohol is a factor in 40% of all violent crimes today, and according
to the Department of Justice, 37% of almost 2 million convicted
offenders currently in jail, report that they were drinking at the
time of their arrest.
Alcohol, more than any illegal drug, was found to be closely
associated with violent crimes, including murder, rape, assault, child
and spousal abuse. About 3 million violent crimes occur each year in
which victims perceive the offender to have been drinking and
statistics related to alcohol use by violent offenders generally show
that about half of all homicides and assaults are committed when the
offender, victim, or both have been drinking. Among violent crimes,
with the exception of robberies, the offender is far more likely to
have been drinking than under the influence of other drugs.
Alcohol is often a factor in violence where the attacker and the
victim know each other. Two-thirds of victims who were attacked by an
intimate (including a current or former spouse, boyfriend or
girlfriend) reported that alcohol had been involved, and only 31% of
victimizations by strangers are alcohol-related. Nearly 500,000
incidents between intimates involve offenders who have been drinking;
in addition, 118,000 incidents of family violence (excluding spouses)
involve alcohol, as do 744,000 incidents among acquaintances.
Post by Dave Smith
Opiates are cheap to produce and it would cost peanuts to keep
someone high on drugs if they could do it legally. Heroin can be
bought for $2 per gram in Afghanistan, where much of it is produced,
but it costs $200 per gram in the US. It is the criminal status of it
and the risk taken by black marketeers that drives up the price to
the point where people have to rob and steal to get the money for
their habit.
Just what we need, a populace DOPED out on cheap legal drugs.
WTF is wrong with you anyway?
You spent your life hassling truckers and this is the best you can offer!
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Enki
Like YOU, shitbag.
Wow. You already lame argument just went form inept to fucking retarded.
Eat my ass, cunt.
Gimme a stick and a fire, and I will.
Dhu
You'll be wearign that stick in your eye, shitbag!
Wearging it eh?
Dhu
Oh the dreaded sp. flame - how droll..
Dhu on Gate
2017-08-18 04:09:40 UTC
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Post by Enki
Post by Enki
Post by Enki
Post by Dhu on Gate
Post by Enki
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Enki
Post by Alan Baker
Why is an drug addict's way of risking his life less valid than
any other thrill seeker's?
Because they imperil the innocent, seed crime, ruin society.
How does someone's addiction to a drug seed crime?
Stop avoiding the citations and you'll know, ya dumb fuck canuck!
https://www.ncadd.org/about-addiction/addiction-update/alcohol-
drugs-
Post by Enki
Post by Enki
and-crime
Post by Enki
Post by Dhu on Gate
Post by Enki
Because alcohol use is legal and pervasive, it plays a particularly
strong role in the relationship to crime and other social problems.
Alcohol is a factor in 40% of all violent crimes today, and
according to the Department of Justice, 37% of almost 2 million
convicted offenders currently in jail, report that they were
drinking at the time of their arrest.
Alcohol, more than any illegal drug, was found to be closely
associated with violent crimes, including murder, rape, assault,
child and spousal abuse. About 3 million violent crimes occur each
year in which victims perceive the offender to have been drinking
and statistics related to alcohol use by violent offenders generally
show that about half of all homicides and assaults are committed
when the offender, victim, or both have been drinking. Among violent
crimes, with the exception of robberies, the offender is far more
likely to have been drinking than under the influence of other
drugs.
Alcohol is often a factor in violence where the attacker and the
victim know each other. Two-thirds of victims who were attacked by
an intimate (including a current or former spouse, boyfriend or
girlfriend) reported that alcohol had been involved, and only 31% of
victimizations by strangers are alcohol-related. Nearly 500,000
incidents between intimates involve offenders who have been
drinking; in addition, 118,000 incidents of family violence
(excluding spouses) involve alcohol, as do 744,000 incidents among
acquaintances.
Post by Dave Smith
Opiates are cheap to produce and it would cost peanuts to keep
someone high on drugs if they could do it legally. Heroin can be
bought for $2 per gram in Afghanistan, where much of it is
produced, but it costs $200 per gram in the US. It is the criminal
status of it and the risk taken by black marketeers that drives up
the price to the point where people have to rob and steal to get
the money for their habit.
Just what we need, a populace DOPED out on cheap legal drugs.
WTF is wrong with you anyway?
You spent your life hassling truckers and this is the best you can offer!
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Enki
Like YOU, shitbag.
Wow. You already lame argument just went form inept to fucking retarded.
Eat my ass, cunt.
Gimme a stick and a fire, and I will.
Dhu
You'll be wearign that stick in your eye, shitbag!
Wearging it eh?
Dhu
Oh the dreaded sp. flame - how droll..
No. Wearging fits you/it.

I thot you were attempting humor, is all ;-)

Dhu
--
Je suis Canadien. Ce n'est pas Francais ou Anglaise.
C'est une esp`ece de sauvage: ne obliviscaris, vix ea nostra voco;-)

http://babayaga.neotext.ca/PublicKeys/Duncan_Patton_a_Campbell_pubkey.txt
Enki
2017-08-18 16:18:23 UTC
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Post by Enki
Post by Enki
Post by Enki
Post by Enki
Post by Dhu on Gate
Post by Enki
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Enki
Post by Alan Baker
Why is an drug addict's way of risking his life less valid than
any other thrill seeker's?
Because they imperil the innocent, seed crime, ruin society.
How does someone's addiction to a drug seed crime?
Stop avoiding the citations and you'll know, ya dumb fuck canuck!
https://www.ncadd.org/about-addiction/addiction-update/alcohol-
drugs-
Post by Enki
Post by Enki
and-crime
Post by Enki
Post by Dhu on Gate
Post by Enki
Because alcohol use is legal and pervasive, it plays a particularly
strong role in the relationship to crime and other social problems.
Alcohol is a factor in 40% of all violent crimes today, and
according to the Department of Justice, 37% of almost 2 million
convicted offenders currently in jail, report that they were
drinking at the time of their arrest.
Alcohol, more than any illegal drug, was found to be closely
associated with violent crimes, including murder, rape, assault,
child and spousal abuse. About 3 million violent crimes occur each
year in which victims perceive the offender to have been drinking
and statistics related to alcohol use by violent offenders generally
show that about half of all homicides and assaults are committed
when the offender, victim, or both have been drinking. Among violent
crimes, with the exception of robberies, the offender is far more
likely to have been drinking than under the influence of other
drugs.
Alcohol is often a factor in violence where the attacker and the
victim know each other. Two-thirds of victims who were attacked by
an intimate (including a current or former spouse, boyfriend or
girlfriend) reported that alcohol had been involved, and only 31% of
victimizations by strangers are alcohol-related. Nearly 500,000
incidents between intimates involve offenders who have been
drinking; in addition, 118,000 incidents of family violence
(excluding spouses) involve alcohol, as do 744,000 incidents among
acquaintances.
Post by Dave Smith
Opiates are cheap to produce and it would cost peanuts to keep
someone high on drugs if they could do it legally. Heroin can be
bought for $2 per gram in Afghanistan, where much of it is
produced, but it costs $200 per gram in the US. It is the criminal
status of it and the risk taken by black marketeers that drives up
the price to the point where people have to rob and steal to get
the money for their habit.
Just what we need, a populace DOPED out on cheap legal drugs.
WTF is wrong with you anyway?
You spent your life hassling truckers and this is the best you can offer!
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Enki
Like YOU, shitbag.
Wow. You already lame argument just went form inept to fucking retarded.
Eat my ass, cunt.
Gimme a stick and a fire, and I will.
Dhu
You'll be wearign that stick in your eye, shitbag!
Wearging it eh?
Dhu
Oh the dreaded sp. flame - how droll..
No.
Yes.

Enki
2017-08-11 14:33:09 UTC
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Post by Liberals are VERMIN!
The great conservative William F. Buckley suggested this 20 years ago. For a year, you'd be dragging bodies off the street. But after one year or so, the people predisposed to addiction would all be dead, alleviating the majority of the drug problem.
Anyone who want to legalize meth, heroin, etc. is insane.

That means YOU!
Dave Smith
2017-08-11 15:43:12 UTC
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Post by Enki
Post by Liberals are VERMIN!
The great conservative William F. Buckley suggested this 20 years
ago. For a year, you'd be dragging bodies off the street. But after
one year or so, the people predisposed to addiction would all be dead,
alleviating the majority of the drug problem.
Anyone who want to legalize meth, heroin, etc. is insane.
That means YOU!
There are definitely some issues with some of those drugs, just like
there are with alcohol. The crime and violence is mainly the result of
the criminal element in the black market and the ridiculously high
prices that result from the criminalization. Years ago I wrote a paper
on the British policy of the 60s where addicts could get heroin through
the national health care system. It cost the government less than 40
cents a day to keep the addicts supplied. At the same time, American
addicts were spending something like $150 a day on junk. That was more
than a week's wages for most working people at the time, so they had to
rob and steal or turn tricks for the money for their drugs.

The current Fentynol crisis is an example of the danger of illegally
supplied drugs. There is no quality control and users don't know what
they are getting. Junkies are especially prone to overdoses because they
don't know exactly how much of the product they are using is what it is
supposed to be or how much it has been stepped on.
Greg Carr
2017-08-11 15:44:24 UTC
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Post by Dave Smith
Post by Enki
Post by Liberals are VERMIN!
The great conservative William F. Buckley suggested this 20 years
ago. For a year, you'd be dragging bodies off the street. But after
one year or so, the people predisposed to addiction would all be dead,
alleviating the majority of the drug problem.
Anyone who want to legalize meth, heroin, etc. is insane.
That means YOU!
There are definitely some issues with some of those drugs, just like
there are with alcohol. The crime and violence is mainly the result of
the criminal element in the black market and the ridiculously high
prices that result from the criminalization. Years ago I wrote a paper
on the British policy of the 60s where addicts could get heroin through
the national health care system. It cost the government less than 40
cents a day to keep the addicts supplied. At the same time, American
addicts were spending something like $150 a day on junk. That was more
than a week's wages for most working people at the time, so they had to
rob and steal or turn tricks for the money for their drugs.
The current Fentynol crisis is an example of the danger of illegally
supplied drugs. There is no quality control and users don't know what
they are getting. Junkies are especially prone to overdoses because they
don't know exactly how much of the product they are using is what it is
supposed to be or how much it has been stepped on.
Some of the addicts ask specifically for fentanyl because mere heroin doesn`t do the trick anymore except ward off withdrawl symptoms.
Enki
2017-08-11 16:55:32 UTC
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Post by Dave Smith
Post by Enki
Post by Liberals are VERMIN!
The great conservative William F. Buckley suggested this 20 years
ago. For a year, you'd be dragging bodies off the street. But after
one year or so, the people predisposed to addiction would all be
dead, alleviating the majority of the drug problem.
Anyone who want to legalize meth, heroin, etc. is insane.
That means YOU!
There are definitely some issues with some of those drugs, just like
there are with alcohol. The crime and violence is mainly the result of
the criminal element in the black market and the ridiculously high
prices that result from the criminalization. Years ago I wrote a paper
on the British policy of the 60s where addicts could get heroin through
the national health care system. It cost the government less than 40
cents a day to keep the addicts supplied. At the same time, American
addicts were spending something like $150 a day on junk. That was more
than a week's wages for most working people at the time, so they had to
rob and steal or turn tricks for the money for their drugs.
The current Fentynol crisis is an example of the danger of illegally
supplied drugs. There is no quality control and users don't know what
they are getting. Junkies are especially prone to overdoses because they
don't know exactly how much of the product they are using is what it is
supposed to be or how much it has been stepped on.
Opioids are a major driver of heroin use.

Those need immediate re-engineering or to be banned/curtailed in many
instances.
j***@gmail.com
2017-08-17 18:46:05 UTC
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It's free choice
Legal or not
The drug cluttered
Will always find a way to score
Enki
2017-08-17 18:55:21 UTC
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Post by j***@gmail.com
It's free choice
Legal or not
The drug cluttered
Will always find a way to score
Legal meth is NOT good.
j***@gmail.com
2017-08-17 21:09:02 UTC
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Post by Enki
Post by j***@gmail.com
It's free choice
Legal or not
The drug cluttered
Will always find a way to score
Legal meth is NOT good.
Yes it is, think of all the crime that it would stop.
They would not have to steel to make the deal.
I
Greg Carr
2017-08-18 00:26:39 UTC
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Meth addicts do a lot of property damage and graffiti and violence while high on the drug. They
develop skin rashes and their teeth bubble. Keep
it illegal.
Enki
2017-08-18 16:13:56 UTC
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Post by j***@gmail.com
Post by Enki
Post by j***@gmail.com
It's free choice
Legal or not
The drug cluttered
Will always find a way to score
Legal meth is NOT good.
Yes it is, think of all the crime that it would stop.
Did legal opiates stop heroin addiction or INCREASE it?

Well???
Post by j***@gmail.com
They would not have to steel to make the deal.
Bullshit!

Heroin/opioid addicts do it all the time.
j***@gmail.com
2017-08-17 21:13:15 UTC
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Not many meth addicts ever come back
So give it to them, control it and it would
Reduce criminal activity.
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