Discussion:
Why are there so few black-owned grocery stores?
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Byker
2018-01-10 12:19:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Here's why: Running a business requires planning, organizing, staffing,
preparation, money management, hard work and long hours, none of which seem
to be in today's Afro-American character. Add discipline, attention to
detail, punctuality -- what a joke, just the thought of it!
---------------------------------------------------------------
Why Are There So Few Black-Owned Grocery Stores?

Tom Perkins
Civil Eats
January 18, 2018

No organizations track the number, but sources familiar with the situation
and some of the remaining grocers suggest that fewer than 10 black-owned
supermarkets remain across the entire country. And the number continues to
shrink: In the past two years alone, Sterling Farms in New Orleans, Apples
and Oranges in Baltimore, and several branches of Calhoun’s in Alabama have
all gone out of business.

This is problematic because strong anchor businesses like grocery stores can
serve as the center of neighborhood economies, recirculating local revenues
through wages and nearby businesses. They can also be neighborhood hubs,
where people go to buy good food as well as employment centers and sources
of community pride. But where there are no grocery stores, or where they’re
not enmeshed in the fabric of the community, problems arise: Grocery store
ownership directly ties to larger struggles and themes like economic
stability, self-determination, power, control, and racial and class
stratification, says Malik Yakini.

Yakini is the director of the Detroit Black Community Food Security Network,
an organization that builds self-reliance, food security, and justice in
Detroit’s black community. When a neighborhood loses a local grocery store,
he says, the African-American community essentially becomes what he
describes as a “domestic colony.”

“[Black neighborhoods] are seen as a place for the more dominant economy to
sell things,” Yakini says. “We’re more interested in building community,
self-determination, and self-reliance. We’re interested in being more than
consumers of goods that others bring to sell, and often goods that are
inferior to what’s sold in the white community.

Large chains like Walmart capitalize on this phenomenon. The company was one
of three to partner with former First Lady Michelle Obama on a controversial
plan to build 1,500 grocery stores in food deserts; fewer than half of those
stores were ever built or renovated, and many of them were shuttered within
the first five years.

In addition to building (and then closing) stores in underserved
communities, Walmart has also been known to bus city residents out of their
neighborhoods and into the suburbs to do their shopping under one roof—an
attractive option for a population that’s not totally mobile in a sprawling
city like Detroit.

Also working in the large chains’ favor is the fact that many stores in
Black neighborhoods like Chicago’s south side or Detroit’s east side are
dirty, the quality of their food is often lower, and there’s a
well-documented pattern of distributors supplying expired or nearly expired
food. Additionally, local shoppers often say that management can be
disrespectful and staff often don’t live nearby.

In Chicago, food activist Sheelah Muhammed’s father ran a Nation of Islam
grocery store that opened in the mid-20th century and partnered with Black
producers to set up businesses to supply its food. But, she says, that fell
apart in the century’s final decades as society integrated and people
gravitated toward large, white-owned chains in a way that earlier
generations didn’t.

“When you’re coming out of slavery, Jim Crow, and having to do for yourself,
having to work within your own community after being segregated—there are
some positives to that. Not that I want to go back to it,” Muhammed says.
“But having to do for yourself and working within your community—we should
go back to that.”

And common arguments that Blacks hear from the right and Libertarian whites
is, “Black people should just go and open grocery stores” or some variation
of the “bootstraps” cliche. But that ignores the difficulty Black people
often have in obtaining capital or experience. Malik Yakini claims that
Black people in Detroit are often shut out of management positions at stores
run by those from outside their community, so they don’t have the experience
necessary to successfully run a supermarket or obtain capital. <snip>

https://civileats.com/2018/01/08/why-are-there-so-few-black-owned-grocery-stores/
Cafe Racer
2018-01-10 18:05:02 UTC
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Post by Byker
Here's why: Running a business requires planning, organizing, staffing,
preparation, money management, hard work and long hours,
You never shopped in Britain's side streets then. I can remember open-till-midnight shops in Liverpool owned by Caribbean families, and the same in Bristol.

Byker, you lose again, on the simple basis of FACT.
onomatopoeia
2018-01-10 18:33:47 UTC
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Post by Cafe Racer
Post by Byker
Here's why: Running a business requires planning, organizing, staffing,
preparation, money management, hard work and long hours,
You never shopped in Britain's side streets then. I can remember open-till-midnight shops in Liverpool owned by Caribbean families, and the same in Bristol.
Byker, you lose again, on the simple basis of FACT.
Racism is a fact-free zone.

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Byker
2018-01-10 21:13:16 UTC
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Post by onomatopoeia
Post by Cafe Racer
Post by Byker
Here's why: Running a business requires planning, organizing, staffing,
preparation, money management, hard work and long hours,
You never shopped in Britain's side streets then. I can remember
open-till-midnight shops in Liverpool owned by Caribbean families, and
the same in Bristol.
Byker, you lose again, on the simple basis of FACT.
Racism is a fact-free zone.
http://puttingitallonthetable.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/famous-amos.jpg
Chris Rock might beg to differ:
--------------------------------------------
"White people have nice supermarkets. Inviting supermarkets. In the white
supermarket, the nice doors slide open, you step in, and cool breeze hits
your face. It's lovely. The whole place says, 'Come on in.'"

"All the white people reading this...: next time you go to the market, kiss
your grocer.

"In the black supermarket the doors are always fucked up. Your have to jump
on the electric pad two or three times to make them open. Now and then the
doors will hit back and smack you in the head It's almost as if they know
you're broke. When you get in, a hot, hot breeze hit you in the face and
place is dark. Half the lights don't work. Some markets don't even have
lights -- only skylights. When the sun goes down, the supermarket is
closed.

"There's nothing fresh in a black supermarket, unless you count 'fresh from
the can.' There's no red meat. The meat is brown. And if you do get some
red meat, you better cook it THAT day because it's gonna be spoiled
tomorrow. You'll wake up and locusts will be having a convention on the
meat -- and all because you wanted to shop black.

"All the fruits are nasty, too. Flies circle around the fruit and even the
flies aren't new. Sometimes the grocer sticks in plastic fruit to try and
fool you -- and the flies. If you can get an apple, it's got a worm in it.

"And the worm is dead."

http://tinyurl.com/qgex3e5
Byker
2018-01-10 21:13:11 UTC
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Post by Cafe Racer
Post by Byker
Here's why: Running a business requires planning, organizing, staffing,
preparation, money management, hard work and long hours,
You never shopped in Britain's side streets then. I can remember
open-till-midnight shops in Liverpool owned by Caribbean families, and the
same in Bristol.
I take it they've never been looted or robbed (repeatedly)...
Truong
2018-01-11 03:23:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Byker
Here's why: Running a business requires planning, organizing, staffing,
preparation, money management, hard work and long hours, none of which seem
to be in today's Afro-American character. Add discipline, attention to
detail, punctuality -- what a joke, just the thought of it!
---------------------------------------------------------------
Why Are There So Few Black-Owned Grocery Stores?
Tom Perkins
Civil Eats
January 18, 2018
No organizations track the number, but sources familiar with the situation
and some of the remaining grocers suggest that fewer than 10 black-owned
supermarkets remain across the entire country. And the number continues to
shrink: In the past two years alone, Sterling Farms in New Orleans, Apples
and Oranges in Baltimore, and several branches of Calhoun’s in Alabama have
all gone out of business.
This is problematic because strong anchor businesses like grocery stores can
serve as the center of neighborhood economies, recirculating local revenues
through wages and nearby businesses. They can also be neighborhood hubs,
where people go to buy good food as well as employment centers and sources
of community pride. But where there are no grocery stores, or where they’re
not enmeshed in the fabric of the community, problems arise: Grocery store
ownership directly ties to larger struggles and themes like economic
stability, self-determination, power, control, and racial and class
stratification, says Malik Yakini.
Maybe they should look up the robbery statistics of those stores.
Post by Byker
Yakini is the director of the Detroit Black Community Food Security Network,
an organization that builds self-reliance, food security, and justice in
Detroit’s black community. When a neighborhood loses a local grocery store,
he says, the African-American community essentially becomes what he
describes as a “domestic colony.”
“[Black neighborhoods] are seen as a place for the more dominant economy to
sell things,” Yakini says. “We’re more interested in building community,
self-determination, and self-reliance. We’re interested in being more than
consumers of goods that others bring to sell, and often goods that are
inferior to what’s sold in the white community.
They get robbed a lot too.
Post by Byker
Large chains like Walmart capitalize on this phenomenon. The company was one
of three to partner with former First Lady Michelle Obama on a controversial
plan to build 1,500 grocery stores in food deserts; fewer than half of those
stores were ever built or renovated, and many of them were shuttered within
the first five years.
EBT cards couldn't keep the overhead paid.
Post by Byker
In addition to building (and then closing) stores in underserved
communities, Walmart has also been known to bus city residents out of their
neighborhoods and into the suburbs to do their shopping under one roof—an
attractive option for a population that’s not totally mobile in a sprawling
city like Detroit.
Also working in the large chains’ favor is the fact that many stores in
Black neighborhoods like Chicago’s south side or Detroit’s east side are
dirty, the quality of their food is often lower, and there’s a
well-documented pattern of distributors supplying expired or nearly expired
food. Additionally, local shoppers often say that management can be
disrespectful and staff often don’t live nearby.
Blacks disrespectful? To other blacks? I'll be. How the fuck does
that happen?
Post by Byker
In Chicago, food activist Sheelah Muhammed’s father ran a Nation of Islam
grocery store that opened in the mid-20th century and partnered with Black
producers to set up businesses to supply its food. But, she says, that fell
apart in the century’s final decades as society integrated and people
gravitated toward large, white-owned chains in a way that earlier
generations didn’t.
“When you’re coming out of slavery, Jim Crow, and having to do for yourself,
having to work within your own community after being segregated—there are
some positives to that. Not that I want to go back to it,” Muhammed says.
“But having to do for yourself and working within your community—we should
go back to that.”
And common arguments that Blacks hear from the right and Libertarian whites
is, “Black people should just go and open grocery stores” or some variation
of the “bootstraps” cliche. But that ignores the difficulty Black people
often have in obtaining capital or experience. Malik Yakini claims that
Black people in Detroit are often shut out of management positions at stores
run by those from outside their community, so they don’t have the experience
necessary to successfully run a supermarket or obtain capital. <snip>
https://civileats.com/2018/01/08/why-are-there-so-few-black-owned-grocery-stores/
Don't people have to show up for work to get trained for management
positions?

When Tyrone shows up 2-3 days out of the 5 he's on the schedule,
doesn't that indicate he's not management material?
Truong
2018-01-11 03:24:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Byker
Here's why: Running a business requires planning, organizing, staffing,
preparation, money management, hard work and long hours, none of which seem
to be in today's Afro-American character. Add discipline, attention to
detail, punctuality -- what a joke, just the thought of it!
---------------------------------------------------------------
Why Are There So Few Black-Owned Grocery Stores?
Tom Perkins
Civil Eats
January 18, 2018
No organizations track the number, but sources familiar with the situation
and some of the remaining grocers suggest that fewer than 10 black-owned
supermarkets remain across the entire country. And the number continues to
shrink: In the past two years alone, Sterling Farms in New Orleans, Apples
and Oranges in Baltimore, and several branches of Calhoun’s in Alabama have
all gone out of business.
This is problematic because strong anchor businesses like grocery stores can
serve as the center of neighborhood economies, recirculating local revenues
through wages and nearby businesses. They can also be neighborhood hubs,
where people go to buy good food as well as employment centers and sources
of community pride. But where there are no grocery stores, or where they’re
not enmeshed in the fabric of the community, problems arise: Grocery store
ownership directly ties to larger struggles and themes like economic
stability, self-determination, power, control, and racial and class
stratification, says Malik Yakini.
Maybe they should look up the robbery statistics of those stores.
Post by Byker
Yakini is the director of the Detroit Black Community Food Security Network,
an organization that builds self-reliance, food security, and justice in
Detroit’s black community. When a neighborhood loses a local grocery store,
he says, the African-American community essentially becomes what he
describes as a “domestic colony.”
“[Black neighborhoods] are seen as a place for the more dominant economy to
sell things,” Yakini says. “We’re more interested in building community,
self-determination, and self-reliance. We’re interested in being more than
consumers of goods that others bring to sell, and often goods that are
inferior to what’s sold in the white community.
They get robbed a lot too.
Post by Byker
Large chains like Walmart capitalize on this phenomenon. The company was one
of three to partner with former First Lady Michelle Obama on a controversial
plan to build 1,500 grocery stores in food deserts; fewer than half of those
stores were ever built or renovated, and many of them were shuttered within
the first five years.
EBT cards couldn't keep the overhead paid.
Post by Byker
In addition to building (and then closing) stores in underserved
communities, Walmart has also been known to bus city residents out of their
neighborhoods and into the suburbs to do their shopping under one roof—an
attractive option for a population that’s not totally mobile in a sprawling
city like Detroit.
Also working in the large chains’ favor is the fact that many stores in
Black neighborhoods like Chicago’s south side or Detroit’s east side are
dirty, the quality of their food is often lower, and there’s a
well-documented pattern of distributors supplying expired or nearly expired
food. Additionally, local shoppers often say that management can be
disrespectful and staff often don’t live nearby.
Blacks disrespectful? To other blacks? I'll be. How the fuck does
that happen?
Post by Byker
In Chicago, food activist Sheelah Muhammed’s father ran a Nation of Islam
grocery store that opened in the mid-20th century and partnered with Black
producers to set up businesses to supply its food. But, she says, that fell
apart in the century’s final decades as society integrated and people
gravitated toward large, white-owned chains in a way that earlier
generations didn’t.
“When you’re coming out of slavery, Jim Crow, and having to do for yourself,
having to work within your own community after being segregated—there are
some positives to that. Not that I want to go back to it,” Muhammed says.
“But having to do for yourself and working within your community—we should
go back to that.”
And common arguments that Blacks hear from the right and Libertarian whites
is, “Black people should just go and open grocery stores” or some variation
of the “bootstraps” cliche. But that ignores the difficulty Black people
often have in obtaining capital or experience. Malik Yakini claims that
Black people in Detroit are often shut out of management positions at stores
run by those from outside their community, so they don’t have the experience
necessary to successfully run a supermarket or obtain capital. <snip>
https://civileats.com/2018/01/08/why-are-there-so-few-black-owned-grocery-stores/
Don't people have to show up for work to get trained for management
positions?

When Tyrone shows up 2-3 days out of the 5 he's on the schedule,
doesn't that indicate he's not management material?
Liberals are VERMIN!
2018-01-11 08:28:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Byker
Here's why: Running a business requires planning, organizing, staffing,
preparation, money management, hard work and long hours, none of which seem
to be in today's Afro-American character. Add discipline, attention to
detail, punctuality -- what a joke, just the thought of it!
---------------------------------------------------------------
Why Are There So Few Black-Owned Grocery Stores?
The black grocery store owners would be too unable to resist shop-lifting from their own establishments.
Dhu on Gate
2018-01-11 08:44:59 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Liberals are VERMIN!
Post by Byker
Here's why: Running a business requires planning, organizing, staffing,
preparation, money management, hard work and long hours, none of which
seem to be in today's Afro-American character. Add discipline,
attention to detail, punctuality -- what a joke, just the thought of
it! ---------------------------------------------------------------
Why Are There So Few Black-Owned Grocery Stores?
The black grocery store owners would be too unable to resist
shop-lifting from their own establishments.
BS. It's cuz black people don't get loans to open corner stores.

Dhu
--
Je suis Canadien. Ce n'est pas Francais ou Anglaise.
C'est une esp`ece de sauvage: ne obliviscaris, vix ea nostra voco;-)

http://babayaga.neotext.ca/PublicKeys/Duncan_Patton_a_Campbell_pubkey.txt
Polar Vortex
2018-01-11 17:15:31 UTC
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Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dhu on Gate
Post by Liberals are VERMIN!
Post by Byker
Here's why: Running a business requires planning, organizing, staffing,
preparation, money management, hard work and long hours, none of which
seem to be in today's Afro-American character. Add discipline,
attention to detail, punctuality -- what a joke, just the thought of
it! ---------------------------------------------------------------
Why Are There So Few Black-Owned Grocery Stores?
The black grocery store owners would be too unable to resist
shop-lifting from their own establishments.
BS. It's cuz black people don't get loans to open corner stores.
Dhu
That's another racist lie!


https://www.mbda.gov/page/grants-and-loans

GRANTS

Grants.gov LogoDespite what the late-night infomercials want you to
believe, the federal government does not provide grants for business
expansion and growth. There is no “free” money for you to start or grow
a business.

Grants.gov is the source to find and apply for federal grants.
Grants.gov is a central storehouse for information on over 1,000 grant
programs and provides access to approximately $500 billion in annual
awards. It does not provide personal financial assistance.
LOANS

Financing a business is never simple whether it's a start-up or a
business that's been around for years. From initial seed money to
working capital needed to keep operations going and to pay bills, access
to capital remains a major barrier to many minority-owned firms.

Let MBDA help you better position your company.

Visit one of our Minority Business Centers for more in depth
one-on-one financial counseling for growth and success of your business.
Get started by gathering together some basic loan documentation.

MBDA does not provide loans or grants to start or expand your business.
The grants MBDA does provide are to organizations that operate MBDA's
Minority Business Centers throughout the United States. These
organizations provide business consulting, procurement matching and
financial assistance to minority-owned firms.
Dhu on Gate
2018-01-12 00:02:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Polar Vortex
Post by Dhu on Gate
Post by Liberals are VERMIN!
Post by Byker
Here's why: Running a business requires planning, organizing, staffing,
preparation, money management, hard work and long hours, none of
which seem to be in today's Afro-American character. Add discipline,
attention to detail, punctuality -- what a joke, just the thought of
it! ---------------------------------------------------------------
Why Are There So Few Black-Owned Grocery Stores?
The black grocery store owners would be too unable to resist
shop-lifting from their own establishments.
BS. It's cuz black people don't get loans to open corner stores.
Dhu
That's another racist lie!
https://www.mbda.gov/page/grants-and-loans
GRANTS
Is this s'posed to prove something? It doesn't. Read this shit before
you post it.
Post by Polar Vortex
Grants.gov LogoDespite what the late-night infomercials want you to
believe, the federal government does not provide grants for business
expansion and growth. There is no “free” money for you to start or grow
And no free lunch. So?

Dhu
Post by Polar Vortex
a business.
Grants.gov is the source to find and apply for federal grants.
Grants.gov is a central storehouse for information on over 1,000 grant
programs and provides access to approximately $500 billion in annual
awards. It does not provide personal financial assistance.
LOANS
Financing a business is never simple whether it's a start-up or a
business that's been around for years. From initial seed money to
working capital needed to keep operations going and to pay bills, access
to capital remains a major barrier to many minority-owned firms.
Let MBDA help you better position your company.
Visit one of our Minority Business Centers for more in depth
one-on-one financial counseling for growth and success of your business.
Get started by gathering together some basic loan documentation.
MBDA does not provide loans or grants to start or expand your business.
The grants MBDA does provide are to organizations that operate MBDA's
Minority Business Centers throughout the United States. These
organizations provide business consulting, procurement matching and
financial assistance to minority-owned firms.
--
Je suis Canadien. Ce n'est pas Francais ou Anglaise.
C'est une esp`ece de sauvage: ne obliviscaris, vix ea nostra voco;-)

http://babayaga.neotext.ca/PublicKeys/Duncan_Patton_a_Campbell_pubkey.txt
Polar Vortex
2018-01-12 00:12:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dhu on Gate
Post by Polar Vortex
Post by Dhu on Gate
Post by Liberals are VERMIN!
Post by Byker
Here's why: Running a business requires planning, organizing, staffing,
preparation, money management, hard work and long hours, none of
which seem to be in today's Afro-American character. Add discipline,
attention to detail, punctuality -- what a joke, just the thought of
it! ---------------------------------------------------------------
Why Are There So Few Black-Owned Grocery Stores?
The black grocery store owners would be too unable to resist
shop-lifting from their own establishments.
BS. It's cuz black people don't get loans to open corner stores.
Dhu
That's another racist lie!
https://www.mbda.gov/page/grants-and-loans
GRANTS
Is this s'posed to prove something? It doesn't. Read this shit before
you post it.
And which people do you suppose the MBDA helps arrange loans to....would
it be say...MINORITIES???

Uh huh.

Done.
Post by Dhu on Gate
Post by Polar Vortex
Grants.gov LogoDespite what the late-night infomercials want you to
believe, the federal government does not provide grants for business
expansion and growth. There is no “free” money for you to start or grow
And no free lunch. So?
Dhu
Read on, DUNCE!
Post by Dhu on Gate
Post by Polar Vortex
a business.
Grants.gov is the source to find and apply for federal grants.
Grants.gov is a central storehouse for information on over 1,000 grant
programs and provides access to approximately $500 billion in annual
awards. It does not provide personal financial assistance.
LOANS
Financing a business is never simple whether it's a start-up or a
business that's been around for years. From initial seed money to
working capital needed to keep operations going and to pay bills, access
to capital remains a major barrier to many minority-owned firms.
Let MBDA help you better position your company.
Visit one of our Minority Business Centers for more in depth
one-on-one financial counseling for growth and success of your business.
Get started by gathering together some basic loan documentation.
MBDA does not provide loans or grants to start or expand your business.
The grants MBDA does provide are to organizations that operate MBDA's
Minority Business Centers throughout the United States. These
organizations provide business consulting, procurement matching and
financial assistance to minority-owned firms.
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